Lifestyle

Seven dingoes culled and another 10 have died on Fraser

Cheryl Bryant from the Save the Fraser Island Dingo group says she has access to at least 1500 pages of observations and recommendations.
Cheryl Bryant from the Save the Fraser Island Dingo group says she has access to at least 1500 pages of observations and recommendations. Rachel Manssen

AT LEAST seven dingoes were humanely destroyed by rangers on Fraser Island between January and October last year, according to documents obtained through the Right to Information Act.

Cheryl Bryant from the Save the Fraser Island Dingo group said she had access to at least 1500 pages of observations and recommendations, many relating to Inky, a dingo that was hunted down and destroyed by rangers on the island last year, as reported in the Chronicle last week.

Inky's brother, Byron, was also mentioned in several of the documents.

He was destroyed last year after a series of incidents.

He was identified for humane destruction after receiving a total of 10 Code C and Code D incidents.

Those included loitering, following closely, stealing food, stealing property, showing dominance towards humans, circling and stalking.

Byron, unlike his brother Inky, was not found guilty of more serious Code E incidents, which allege more obvious aggression.

Ms Bryant said Byron did not deserve his fate.

She said according to the reports, Byron did not nip, bite or act aggressively and many people felt that Byron was a playful, placid pup.

Along with the dingoes that were destroyed by rangers, 10 others died from other causes, such as vehicle strike, but it was unknown how many dingoes died in the past year as not all were recorded.

"It is difficult to understand how such a small population of dingoes could generate so many incidents," Ms Bryant said.

Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service Area manager Ross Belcher said the dingo named Byron was destroyed on October 4 following "increasingly aggressive incidents involving children".

"Rangers were concerned by the predatory aggressive behaviour of the animal, which had escalated during the school holiday period.

"The safety of children and families visiting Fraser Island is of paramount importance."

Mr Belcher said the dingo population on the island was healthy.

Topics:  culling, deaths, dingoes, fraser island, right to information




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