Sport

Think twice before fighting on the field

FISTS FLY: Wallaroos forward Joshua Crowley and Brothers rival Joel McCrea comes to blows at Salter Oval.
FISTS FLY: Wallaroos forward Joshua Crowley and Brothers rival Joel McCrea comes to blows at Salter Oval. Ben Turnbull BUNLEA

MANY sporting teams have that player who suffers from white-line fever, that person that transforms from a mild-mannered accountant to someone who would take on 100 players if it meant winning the game.

While some sports are more physical than others and have a culture of aggressive behaviour James Cook University professor Joann Lukins said the onus is always on the individual player to control their actions and being the most aggressive player on the field isn't always a good thing.

Some sports are more suited to aggressive and assertive personalities but Dr Lukins, an associate professor of sport and exercise science, said regardless of the game being played those athletes who step outside the rules don't have enhanced personal performance or help the team's cause.

Dr Lukins, who also serves as sport psychologist with the North Queensland Cowboys, said she understands how a player's behaviour off the field has to be different to that on it to be successful in their chosen sport.

She said regardless of the level of competition, one of the keys to controlling behaviour is giving the players a defined set of instructions before each game.

"Players need to know what is required of them in their role (on the field) because it will be a little bit different to how they act on a day-to-day basis," Dr Lukins said.

"The challenge for athletes is to be assertive and keep their sense about them, to be able to make good decisions.

"We know when people are in a very violent frame of mind they are not thinking very clearly.

"It's not beneficial for an athlete to go out and be violent but it's beneficial for an athlete to be aggressive within the confines of the rules."

While there are some players who cross the line and lose control, others take some time before they explode.

Dr Lukins said many factors could contribute to a player losing control and becoming violent, including frustration at refereeing calls and retaliating to being hit.

But Dr Lukins said no matter what happened during the course of the game, the players are the ones who control what happens on the field.

"Ultimately I think the athlete has to take responsibility," she said.

"It's the athlete who makes the decisions to be violent, they have to take responsibility for that."

Many sporting codes have increased penalties for inappropriate on- and off-field incidences and there are fewer replays of altercations in televised games shown, something Dr Lukins said had impacted positively on reducing violence.

"I am pleased to see there is less violence on the sporting field when my kids are watching, I think that is a good thing," she said.

Topics:  fighting, rugby league




$700,000 worth of works done at Hervey Bay Airport

10 years of jets at Hervey Bay Airport - Virgin flight arrives from Sydney. Photo: Alistair Brightman / Fraser Coast Chronicle

A new departure lounge is one of latest additions to airport.

'What a great day for all the family': Letter

Daniel and Kristy Wright picnicked with a seafood box.

What a tremendous family atmosphere the festival provided.

UPDATE: More doctors called in to deal with gastro outbreak

There are many tried and tested ways to prevent this scene the morning after.

"Severity of symptoms and duration go hand in hand."

Latest deals and offers

Blac Chyna sued after car injured 2 women

Blac Chyna is being sued after her friend crashed into another car

Bachelor Richie gives bacon-loving Noni the boot

Noni Janur features on this season of The Bachelor.

TOOWOOMBA swimwear designer still single but focusing on her career.

Chris Hemsworth surprises kids at hospital as Thor

Chris Hemsworth and Tom Hiddleston surprised children at hospital

MOVIE REVIEW: War Dogs tells a fascinating true story

Miles Teller and Jonah Hill in a scene from the movie War Dogs.

DARKLY funny film examines the business side of the war on terror.

Marvel-ous: Thor actors visit sick kids at Lady Cilento

Stars of Thor: Ragnarok dropped in on patients at the hospital

Folk singer looking forward to her Gympie Muster debut

Alternative country folk singer Fanny Lumsden will perform at the Gympie Muster.

FANNY Lumsden to serenade new fans with her country hall-style show.

ISLAND FOR SALE: Cheap Fraser Coast island drops price again

Suna Island in the Great Sandy Strait will be auctioned by Ray White Hervey Bay on Saturday morning.

This is the cheapest island you will find for sale in Australia

How a family home can fit on a 250sq m block

This is what you can build on 250m2.

Here's the floor plan of a home built on 250sq m

$100m plan for Curtis Island 'world class' luxury resort

$100 million resort: Top views at Turtle Street at Curtis Island.

"At the moment we think it meets all the town planning approvals.”

Coast building approvals at seven-year high: report

The the 2015/16 Development Indicators Annual Highlights Report documents local development activity that took place during the last financial year.

New report shows increasing development on the Sunshine Coast

Top honours for Mackay and Whitsunday builders

The Kerrisdale Gardens property from Paynter Dixon Queensland which won them Project of the Year.

Mackay and Whitsunday builders awarded top honours last night.