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What led to Fraser Island dingo Inky’s death

A SERIES of incidents involving tourists led to the destruction of a much-loved dingo pup on Fraser Island.

The Save the Fraser Island Dingo Group has gained access to a series of reports via the Freedom of Information Act detailing the events that led to the destruction of the dingo.

Inky, as the dingo pup was known, was involved in several incidents that were coded by the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service.

During his life, Inky had at least 25 coded incidents - Code C incidents were less severe incidents, Code D were more severe and Code E incidents were critical.

Inky had a total of four Code E incidents before he was destroyed by rangers after being declared a dangerous dingo.

Those incidents included "lunging" at a couple and their children and coming out of bushland at speed towards a group of people playing volleyball on the beach.

Inky was also said to have grabbed hold of at least two tourists with his mouth, although he did not break the skin during either incident.

Some of the lesser incidents, for which Inky received a Code C, included loitering near people or living near or under places inhabited by people.

Cheryl Bryant from the Save the Fraser Island Dingoes group said such behaviours were enough to categorise the dingo as a problem animal but it was the four Code E incidents that sealed Inky's fate.

She said as a juvenile dingo, some of Inky's behaviours that were termed aggressive were normal for a developing dingo.

In the reports it was also revealed that of the 22 dingoes that received ear tags last year, four have since died although the causes of death were not clear.

 

Ross Belcher, Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service Great Sandy Regional Manager, said Inky was destroyed because of its "continued aggressive and dangerous behaviour towards people, including at least three incidents involving children".

"Public safety is paramount and, in accordance with the Fraser Island Dingo Management Strategy, humane destruction is required when habituated dingoes become aggressive and dangerous towards people," Mr Belcher said.

"These decisions are not taken lightly and a thorough assessment of the number and type of incidents and the level of aggression is taken into account.

"It appears this dingo had become habituated and lost its fear of people.

"Unfortunately, that is when these dangerous incidents can occur."

Topics:  dingo, fraser island dingoes




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