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How changing the music volume nearly killed Jade

Jade Scrim has told her story in a bid to remind other drivers how quickly their lives can change through a momentary lapse of attention.
Jade Scrim has told her story in a bid to remind other drivers how quickly their lives can change through a momentary lapse of attention. Brendan Bufi

WHILE driving at 100kmh on Maryborough Hervey Bay Rd, Jade Scrim looked down for a few seconds to change the music volume.

"When I looked up I was on the wrong side of the road," she said.

The 21-year-old never thought she'd be involved in a serious crash.

After initial pain and months of intense recovery, Ms Scrim has reflected on the split-second she took her eyes off the road.

She couldn't believe how easily the incident happened.

Ms Scrim remembers being on the wrong side of the white lines, but that's about all she recalls about the crash that closed the road for more than nine hours.

But while she was blacked out, emergency services worked frantically to cut the then 21-year-old from her crushed Ford Focus.

Emergency service crews work to remove driver Jade Scrim after a four-vehicle crash near Dundathu left her trapped.
Emergency service crews work to remove driver Jade Scrim after a four-vehicle crash near Dundathu left her trapped. Robyne Cuerel

Back at her River Heads home was her father, Andrew Scrim, who had heard about the crash and the subsequent delays on the radio.

"We gave her a call to let her know there was a traffic jam but couldn't get a hold of her," he recalls.

Ten frantic phone calls later he knew something was wrong - so police were called.

"They informed us that a black car, which was my wife's car, was in the crash," he said.

Mr Scrim arrived in Brisbane to find his daughter with glass all over her face, in a critical condition with bleeding on the brain.

She remained in an induced coma for three days.

The road to recovery has been a difficult one.

In the crash she broke both feet, a thigh bone, hip, jaw and was stabbed in the stomach.

Both Ms Scrim and her father acknowledge she is lucky to be alive.

After three months at RBH she was transferred to the brain injury recovery unit.

She has told the Chronicle her story in a bid to remind other drivers how quickly their lives could change through a momentary lapse of attention.

Due to her brain injury, Ms Scrim needs to pass a driving test this Friday to get her licence back and she plans to go back to work at Legends Hairdressing in Maryborough next week.

Ms Scrim already knew how easily a serious accident could happen after she witnessed a 17-year-old girl's car smash into a power pole on Boundary Road in 2010.

"She hit the pole and I was there and I saw it so that freaked me out," she said.

"That scared me to not even go near my phone."

"I saw her go up on the gutter and then hit the pole."

The teen later died in hospital.

Despite witnessing that crash, Ms Scrim never thought it would happen to her.

"It could be you," she said.

Topics:  car crash, dundathu, editors picks, maryborough-hervey bay rd, semitrailer




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