Moment tsunami victim was swept away

 

WARNING: Images and video may be distressing

Shocking footage has emerged of a person swept away in Indonesia's devastating tsunami.

It's unclear whether the person survived the incident.

The terrifying moment came when a tsunami roared through Indonesian towns after the volcano Anuk Krakatoa in the Sunda Strait erupted, sparking a six-metre wave.

A CCTV camera captured the aftermath as water crashed through homes, boats, shops and food stalls.

Footage showed water cascading through glass doors at the entrance to a home.

As debris swirled through the streets, destroying the glass gates - a person washes through on the waves followed by debris from surrounding buildings as well as trees.

It comes as a 5.0-magnitude earthquake rocked Indonesia less than 24 hours after the tsunami hit.

See the footage above.

A victim of the latest Indonesian tsunami is washed away. Picture: Supplied
A victim of the latest Indonesian tsunami is washed away. Picture: Supplied

 

The quake struck 23km off Tiku, at a depth of 97.1km, according to data from the US Geological Survey. Tiku is located northwest of Indonesia's Sunda Strait, where the tsunami struck.

The deadly tsunami struck in the dark, without warning, killing at least 222 people and injuring more than 800 more.

Waves smashed into houses, hotels and other beachside buildings on Saturday night following an eruption and possible landslide on Anak Krakatau, one of the world's most infamous volcanic islands.

Wrecked cars lie on top of the ruins of a house destroyed by the tsunami. Picture: Getty
Wrecked cars lie on top of the ruins of a house destroyed by the tsunami. Picture: Getty

More than 800 others were injured and dozens were reported missing after the tsunami hit coastal areas along western Java and southern Sumatra islands at 9.27pm amid a Christmas holiday weekend, the Disaster Management Agency said.

DFAT CHECKING ON STATUS OF AUSSIES

The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade is working to determine if any Australians are among the 222 dead in a tsunami which hit beaches in Indonesia.

The tsunami devastated the tourist hotspot of Tanjung Lesung, near Jakarta, as well as beaches in South Lampung and Serang in the Sunda Strait area between the islands of Java and Sumatra on Saturday night.

"We understand that at present there are no foreigners, let alone Australians, who have been impacted by this," Prime Minister Scott Morrison told reporters on Sunday.

The Australian Embassy in Jakarta was making "urgent inquiries" to find out if any Australians were affected, a DFAT spokesman said.

The deadly wave was believed to have been triggered by an underwater landslide from volcanic eruptions and comes three months after more than 2500 people were killed by an earthquake and tsunami which hit the city of Palu on the island of Sulawesi.

"This is a terrible blow for Indonesia," Mr Morrison said.

"This comes on top of what had happened in Sulawesi and so as always, we're available to support the Indonesian government with these things, as requested.

"There have been no such requests. I'm not anticipating any on this occasion. But should they present, then obviously we will work with the Indonesian government as they request."

 

A hotel sign damaged lays shattered on the beach. Picture: Getty Images
A hotel sign damaged lays shattered on the beach. Picture: Getty Images

Oxfam was preparing to send an assessment team to the area and respond as required.

"We know affected communities will need food and access to clean water," Oxfam Australia's Humanitarian Manager Meg Quartermaine said.

People were seen running in fear from the monster waves after the tsunami hit, according to Indonesia media.

The country's climatology agency believes an eruption of the Mount Anak Krakatau volcano could have caused the tsunami.

The death toll is expected to grow.

A man looks into body bags searching for a missing relative at a makeshift morgue. Picture: Getty
A man looks into body bags searching for a missing relative at a makeshift morgue. Picture: Getty

SECOND TSUNAMI TO HIT INDONESIA IN 2018

It was the second deadly tsunami to hit Indonesia this year, but the one that killed more than 2500 people on the island of Sulawesi on September 28 was accompanied by a powerful earthquake that gave residents a brief warning before the waves struck.

On Saturday night, the ground did not shake beforehand to alert people to the oncoming wave that ripped buildings from their foundations in seconds and swept terrified concertgoers on a popular resort beach into the sea.

Dramatic video posted on social media showed the Indonesian pop band Seventeen performing under a tent on popular Tanjung Lesung beach at a concert for employees of a state-owned electricity company.

 

Dozens of people sat at tables while others swayed to the music near the stage as strobe lights flashed and theatrical smoke was released. A child could also be seen wandering through the crowd.

Seconds later, with the drummer pounding just as the next song was about to begin, the stage suddenly heaved forward and buckled under the force of the water, tossing the band and its equipment into the audience.

The group released a statement saying their bass player, guitarist and road manager were killed, while two other band members and the wife of one of the performers were missing.

Disaster agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said 222 deaths had been confirmed and at least 843 people were injured.

The worst-affected area was the Pandeglang region of Java's Banten province, which encompasses Ujung Kulon National Park and popular beaches, the agency said.

In the city of Bandar Lampung on Sumatra, hundreds of residents took refuge at the governor's office, while at the popular resort area of Anyer beach on Java, some survivors wandered in the debris.

Tourists who were enjoying the long holiday weekend ahead of Christmas were also affected.

"I had to run, as the wave passed the beach and landed 15-20m inland," said Norwegian Oystein Lund Andersen, in a Facebook post. The self-described photographer and volcano enthusiast said he was taking pictures of the volcano when he suddenly saw the water racing towards him. He and his family fled safely to higher ground.

 

Twisted steel girders are all that’s left of a music stage after the deadly tsunami. Picture: Getty
Twisted steel girders are all that’s left of a music stage after the deadly tsunami. Picture: Getty

The damage became apparent after daybreak on Sunday.

Nine hotels and hundreds of homes were heavily damaged by the waves. Broken chunks of concrete and splintered sticks of wood littered hard-hit coastal areas, turning beach getaways popular with Jakarta residents into near ghost towns. Vehicles were tossed into the rubble or were buried under collapsed roofs. Debris from thatch-bamboo shacks was strewn along beaches. Yellow, orange and black body bags were laid out, and weeping relatives identified the dead.

Scientists said the tsunami could have been caused by landslides, either above ground or under water, on the steep slope of the erupting Anak Krakatau volcano. The scientists also cited tidal waves caused by the full moon. The 305-metre-high Anak Krakatau, which means "Child of Krakatoa", has been erupting since June and did so again about 24 minutes before the tsunami, the geophysics agency said.



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