Anna Bligh's ‘atom bomb’ effort

THE STATE Government is “using an atom bomb to crack a nut” with new sustainability laws that home owners will have to meet from January 1 – before they can sell their properties.

Real Estate Institute of Queensland Fraser Coast boss Alan Wetton yesterday said he had fired off questions to Premier Anna Bligh about the legislation and also to Minister for Infrastructure and Planning Stirling Hinchliffe.

“But apart from their acknowledging they’ve received my emails I’ve had no further response.

“Frankly I’d rather not get their responses. I want this legislation knocked on the head but I reckon the government’s too embarrassed to do so.”

Mr Hinchliffe has announced a three-month moratorium on fining home owners who fail to comply with the legislation by answering several pages of questions in a sustainability declaration and then handing that to the real estate agent. If buyers complain about the declarations the council will have the power to investigate and fines can be imposed.

“Next year the Federal Government is bringing legislation that allows inspectors to carry out audits on homes and advise home owners on how they can best make their houses sustainability friendly.

“So why on earth does Anna Bligh have to bring in her own legislation?”

Mr Wetton wants the government to make the declaration form non-compulsory for other than new homes or have the government pay inspectors to carrying out a sustainability audit for each house as it is offered for sale.

Other questions to the premier and minister included:

  • Can you confirm the correctness that the sustainability declaration seminars held around the state (except for Fraser Coast) advised that an agent can white out the owner’s name and signature and address of the property on the declaration for privacy reasons?
  • Will the DIP forward copies of the declaration to people who do not have internet access?
  • Do leasehold properties sold under the Manufactured Homes Act such as retirement villages require a declaration?


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