National team coach Matthew Mott is seen during an Australian women's cricket training session at the Gallipoli Barracks in Brisbane, Thursday, September 14, 2017. The Australian women's cricket team experienced Army life and attempted the over-water obstacle course with members of the Australian Defence Force (ADF) women's cricket team as part of their preparation for the Commonwealth Bank Women's Ashes Series. (AAP Image/Albert Perez) NO ARCHIVING
National team coach Matthew Mott is seen during an Australian women's cricket training session at the Gallipoli Barracks in Brisbane, Thursday, September 14, 2017. The Australian women's cricket team experienced Army life and attempted the over-water obstacle course with members of the Australian Defence Force (ADF) women's cricket team as part of their preparation for the Commonwealth Bank Women's Ashes Series. (AAP Image/Albert Perez) NO ARCHIVING ALBERT PEREZ

Aussie coach hits out at English for slow play

AUSTRALIA coach Matthew Mott has unloaded on England for slowing the Ashes Test from day one, which made it almost impossible for the match to end with a result.

Speaking after the match, that ended in a draw, Mott was frustrated Australia were forced to soak up nearly two days batting in the first innings in order to take a big lead over England.

It left the Australians with just over a day to try to bowl England out on a lifeless wicket.

Mott felt England went for the safe option of a draw to keep the series alive.

"I think both teams have got to be honest about whether they were trying to win the Test match,” Mott said.

"To bat with pretty minimal intent on day one when you get the best of the conditions, I think if you're going to sit back and say you trying to win the Test is not in my realms of thinking.

"We certainly would've been disappointed with that scoring rate on day one. That slowed the whole Test match up and made it difficult to get 20 wickets for both teams.”

England won the toss in the Test and batted first, but scored at a rate of less than two an over until about the 30th over and never got above 2.5 for the innings.

Australia then batted for much of the second and third days to make a score of 448, thanks largely to Ellyse Perry's 213 not out.

But without taking a wicket when England went back in late on the third day, it was too big a task to take 10 wickets on the final day on a flat track.

"I thought it was a monumental effort for us to bowl them out for 280 given they won the toss and batted first on that wicket,” Mott said.

"We were really pleased with that but I suppose that backed us into a bit of a corner with the game taking a slow path that we had to bat big in that first innings and get right ahead and roll the dice that we could get 10 wickets and not have to bat again.

"It certainly wasn't the way we wanted to play the Test but I'm pretty sure if there was maybe a bit more grass on day one and two, got the first innings through a bit quicker that we might have seen that result.”

Had Australia won the Test (worth four points), it would have meant they retained the Ashes being 4-2 ahead on points going into it and needing eight points to hold on to the trophy for another series.

The drawn result gave each team two points, keeping England's hopes alive but meaning they must win all three T20s for victory.



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