It is believed the horses may have contracted the virus from microbats.
It is believed the horses may have contracted the virus from microbats. Contributed

Horses contract bat virus but no bats at Allora property

BIOSECURITY Queensland personnel met with Highborne Farm owner Cameron Osborne at the weekend after two horses on his west Allora property contracted the deadly Australian bat lyssavirus.

Just how the horses contracted the disease remains a mystery and Mr Osborne said the department would carry out further testing in a bid to determine the cause.

"We're just working out how it happened but we are mystified," he said.

"We have no bats out here and we've scoured the place head to toe and there are no bats.

"We were looking especially for the insectivorous bats (microbats) but came back with nothing."

Mr Osborne said he was confident the other 20 horses on the property would remain in good health as they showed no similar signs to the two infected horses before they were euthanised.

He remained positive about the future of the farm and insisted it would be back to business once this had passed.

"We are really keen to learn about the lyssavirus and any other precautions we should take we will," he said.

"We go to great lengths to make sure this is a safe environment and we will continue to do so."

This is the first time a horse has ever contracted the disease.



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