It only takes a little disturbance in Gayndah before bats begin flying out across the Burnett River.
It only takes a little disturbance in Gayndah before bats begin flying out across the Burnett River. Rose Reed

This is bat country, or is it?

GAYNDAH is hoping for a swift decision on North Burnett Council’s application for a bat mitigation permit, to move on thousands of bats plaguing the town.

Councillors met with the Department of Environment and Resource Management, Queensland Health and Bio Security Queensland in Brisbane last week to discuss fast-tracking its application.

Mayor Joy Jensen said the council had been assured it would receive swift assistance to have the permit passed.

“We do have a pre-lodgement meeting scheduled in Gayndah next week,” she said.

“We have been given assurance that they will process the application in a timely manner.”

Cr Jensen said a future management draft plan was discussed at the meeting, which would give a “three-year window” for damage mitigation permits, if the bats returned.

“For those towns with permanent colonies, that will be wonderful for them,” she said.

The mayor hoped Gayndah’s bat situation was “a one-off”.

“It’s an exceptional situation for so many bats to take up residence in close proximity to human activity and traffic,” she said. “I believe we can manage the situation to make sure they don’t come back.”



How the Coast’s drug reality has changed to where it is now

premium_icon How the Coast’s drug reality has changed to where it is now

The faces may change but the problems related to drug abuse haven't

SNAPSHOT: Expert outlines addiction on the Fraser Coast

premium_icon SNAPSHOT: Expert outlines addiction on the Fraser Coast

Alasdair McLay has spent more than 30 years working with addiction

Council to vote on mandatory rain tanks in new builds report

premium_icon Council to vote on mandatory rain tanks in new builds report

As welcome rain finally fell yesterday evening, Fraser Coast mayor George Seymour...