News

REVEALED: What people want cremated with them

FROM travelling overseas with the ashes of your mother to perhaps never collecting them, there are no limits in the crematorium industry.

With death an inevitable part of life, Gladstone Valley Funerals funeral director Adele Hughes is lifting the misconceptions and erasing the taboo about what really happens in a crematorium.

"We've had people who wanted to put a stubbie in with dad ... others put in other people's ashes," Ms Hughes said.

Ms Hughes said cigarettes in the top pockets of shirts, knitting needles, pens, crossword books, children's drawings and any mementos are often cremated along with the dead person.

"We can't put things that explode, like glass, because it will damage the (chamber)," she said.

END OF THE LINE: Those working in a local crematorium reveal how differently each of us deals with the inevitable, death.
END OF THE LINE: Those working in a local crematorium reveal how differently each of us deals with the inevitable, death.

Funeral assistant Cilla O'Hare said she had even seen people put remote controls in the coffins because "dad liked to channel surf".

The most common misconception about cremations was people thinking their loved ones were removed from the coffin to be cremated, Ms Hughes said.

The funeral director said the deceased remain in their coffins and were cremated with their belongings as long as it was safe to do so.

"I think it goes back to the war years ... and big gas chambers ... where they cremated more than one at a time," Ms Hughes said.

"But it's built to size. More than one coffin wouldn't fit, it's only one at a time."

The cremation process is computerised.

Crematoriums use gas, and the length of time it takes to cremate a person, depends on the size of the body and bone mass.

"People often ask how long it takes to be cremated ... the bigger bones don't cremate down," Ms Hughes said.

Although most family members collect the ashes in their own time, some ashes don't ever get collected.

Ms Hughes said they had about 50 "long term residents" which would remain at the funeral home until they were collected.

When Ms Hughes took over, she said she inherited between 20 and 30 sets of ashes, meaning they've been there for at least 20 years.

"Most families take them ... but you'll find those who don't, have moved on and left Gladstone, or are waiting for their partners so both sets of ashes can be together," she said.

For 2016 there were 136 cremations at Boyne Island's crematorium and 70 burials, making the method 70% more popular than a burial, according to Ms Hughes.

"I think it's the cleanliness and being able to take loved ones home ... you can do anything with the ashes," she said.

One woman was travelling around the world when her mother died and Ms Hughes said she got her cremated and took the ashes the rest of the way with her.

"One woman takes her husband (ashes) overseas and goes through airport security with him," she said.

Death is an all year round inevitable event, but there were peak times of the year including during winter, with the elderly, Ms Hughes said.

"We like to make the funeral as much about the person who's died as possible and encourage it to be as personal as possible," Ms Hughes said.

Topics:  cremation death funeral general-seniors-news gladstone gladstone region wellbeing



Don’t go chasing waterfalls…find them on these drives!

BRISBANE isn’t all bright lights and city slickers.

Science Festival seriously awesome

Don't miss the World Science Festival Brisbane!

CALLING everyone who wants to see something totally cool.

Drink where the cool kids do this summer

There are a bunch of new bars open in Brisbane, make sure you're there!

CHECK out these new funky bars.

Discover Brisbane’s laneway gems

Brisbane's laneways will surprise you.

NOT all of Brisbane City is as it seems…

Top five things to experience this summer in Brisbane

Tangalooma is amazing if you're keen for a dive, kayak or swim.

THIS summer get out and explore your capital city.

Your boots are made for walking these tours

Brisbane Greeters tours are a great way to learn the local history of the city.

YOU don’t need a bike or bus for a seriously good tour of Brisbane.

Is Brisbane the new arts and culture capital?

Check out GOMA's latest exhibition - it's all about hair! GOMA 10 Ambassador Patience Hodgson visits Nervescape V 2016 by Icelandic artist Hrafnhildur Arnardóttir (aka Shoplifter), commissioned for ‘Sugar Spin: you, me, art and everything’ at the Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane. 
Photograph: Natasha Harth, QAGOMA

THE rest of the world should be envious of this line-up!

BREAKING: crews on scene of Fraser Coast fire

Photo: Valerie Horton / Fraser Coast Chronicle

The fire was reported to the Torquay Fire Station about 2pm.

Aus Post CEO hits back at Pauline Hanson

Ahmed Fahour.

Fahour hits out at his consistent critic Pauline Hanson

M'boro RSL keen to help drought-stricken farmers

Run out of water and losing crops - Col, Mark and Bill Ward, of Bilcormack Enterprises, rely on the rapidly dwindling supply of dam water, to irrigate their small crops.

There are plenty of scraps for feed.

Local Partners

Buderim dad rejects gay son's emotional plea for second time

Bride and Prejudice: Son’s emotional plea rejected again by unmoved father

What's on the big screen this week

Ewan McGregor and Jonny Lee Miller in a scene from the movie T2: Trainspotting.

This week's new releases offer plenty of variety for movie buffs.

Musical to come to life at Brolga Theatre

The wardrobe team surrounded by fabrics and accessories in the costume room at the Brolga Theatre.

Ken is no stranger to the Maryborough music scene

REVIEW: Under the Gun doco looks at right to bear arms

ARMED: A still from the 2016 documentary film Under the Gun by Stephanie Soechtig.

An in-depth look into America's gun culture.

Hodges proud to be part of first channel dedicated to NRL

Justin Hodges is gearing up for his new gig on Fox League.

Footy star hopes to provide a voice for players on new NRL channel

Selling Houses renovate for Salvos in 100th episode

Charlie Albone, Andrew Winter and Shaynna Blaze return for season 10 of Selling Houses Australia. Supplied by Foxtel.

Selling Houses launch 10th season in volatile property market

Furious Price wants to quit I'm a Celeb after clash with Keira

Steve Price has threatened to quit the jungle.

Will camp ration clash with Keira cause Steve to call it quits?

$140k damage: landlord says property trashed, contaminated

He had what he calls "the tenants from hell"

Submarine, buses and 3000 tyres removed in $100K clean up

The list of things removed from this property is beyond astonishing

Popular island resort sells to loaded international investor

OUR PICK: Chris Foey's colourful shot of one of Gladstone's great tourism hot spots, Heron Island.

International investor snaps up piece of Gladstone paradise.

Expert: Why renters, home buyers may struggle

Matusik Property Insights director Michael Matusik.

What's next for the city's housing market

Ready to SELL your property?

Post Your Ad Here!