The bollards have been replaced at Poona’s foreshore but Mike Hart says they’re only two severe storms away from falling down again.
The bollards have been replaced at Poona’s foreshore but Mike Hart says they’re only two severe storms away from falling down again.

Bollards up but for how long?

THE imporvements at Poona’s foreshore have been coming thick and fast – and resident Mike Hart is glad to see it.

Erosion had turned a car park near Poona’s foreshore into a dangerous eyesore – and Mr Hart is glad that at least the dangerous part is no longer true.

The foreshore was battered when Cyclone Hamish hit the coast early last year and the bollards that had prevented motorists from driving down the car park’s steep embankment had collapsed.

Orange netting that had been up to alert drivers to the danger had also begun to sag 11 months after the cyclone hit.

Mr Hart was pleased to see new netting had been put up at the foreshore last week and now new bollards have been installed.

But he wants to remind the Fraser Coast Regional Council that it is only a temporary solution to a larger problem.

Mr Hart estimates that the foreshore can withstand about two more severe storms before the bollards once again fall down.

This time the bollards have been placed more than two metres from the edge but without a solution to the erosion they will meet the same fate as the old bollards, Mr Hart said.

“This is about the third or fourth time the bollards have had to be replaced.”

Mr Hart said the erosion would make the car park difficult to manoeuvre for those with caravans, as it gets shorter and shorter.

A waste treatment plant is about one and a half severe storms away from going over, Mr Hart estimates, adding that he wouldn’t like to be there if it did.

Mr Hart said a couple of truckloads of rocks were needed to prevent further erosion in the area.

A spokesperson for the council last week told the Chronicle that work was being done to develop a Shoreline Management Plan for the 112km of open coastline, stretching from Burrum Heads to Tinnanbar.

The council has received $24,000 from the State Government and is currently working to develop a plan.

It has committed funds in the current financial year towards the project.

“They say they’ve got 112km subject to erosion that they have to manage,” Mr Hart said

“I’m saying why not start with this spot?”

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