Wishart resident Kristen Doyle talks about her battle with endometriosis.
Wishart resident Kristen Doyle talks about her battle with endometriosis.

‘Doctors laughed at me and didn’t believe my pain’

A BRISBANEwoman says she was "laughed at" and ridiculed by doctors who misdiagnosed her excruciating pain for four years.

Endometriosis sufferer Kristen Doyle is one of a long line of women being told that painful periods are 'normal'.

That's a myth Ms Doyle is working hard to dispel this global Endometriosis Awareness Month, which runs until March 31.

Wishart resident Kristen Doyle has endometriosis. She is pictured with her partner Mitch.
Wishart resident Kristen Doyle has endometriosis. She is pictured with her partner Mitch.

 

The Wishart resident knows exactly what it's like to front up to your doctor-then another one, and another one-with stories of how the pain is stopping her from functioning in everyday life, only be given the runaround.

"I've been told it is everything from celiac disease, irritable bowel disease, stomach ulcers to stress,' Ms Doyle said.

"Growing up I'd always had painful periods but was told it was normal. I'm here to tell you it is not.

Wishart resident Kristen Doyle talks about her battle with endometriosis.
Wishart resident Kristen Doyle talks about her battle with endometriosis.

'By 2012, severe and ongoing pain was my permanent state of being and I could not take it

anymore-something needed to change."

Ms Doyle said it took her four years to get an answer and she was only able to get one after demanding surgery from her gynaecologist who'd initially laughed at her for suggesting endometriosis.

Getting a diagnosis was huge relief but it didn't mean Ms Doyle was pain free.

Endometriosis is a chronic menstrual disease where tissue, similar to the lining of the uterus, is found in and on other parts of the body. Common symptoms include: pelvic pain, cramping, painful periods, painful sex, heavy bleeding, infertility, fatigue, bloating and nausea.

Wishart resident Kristen Doyle talks about her battle with endometriosis. She is pictured with her partner Mitch.
Wishart resident Kristen Doyle talks about her battle with endometriosis. She is pictured with her partner Mitch.

There is no cure for endometriosis, so Ms Doyle alongside the nearly 700,000 other Australian women with endometriosis, uses surgery, drug therapy and alternative treatments to reduce her symptoms and improve her wellbeing.

"It is unlikely that I will ever be pain free but having a diagnosis makes a huge difference. I now know what I'm dealing with, and having my pain and experience acknowledged goes a long way," she said.

March is the global awareness month for endometriosis, and is an opportunity to start a conversation about endo.

Endo is not the end, and there is a range of support available. Find out more about endometriosis at www.qendo.org.au or for 24/7 support, call 07 3321 4408.



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