DRAWCARD: Even if you have a small backyard you can still learn how to attract local wildlife at a number of upcoming workshops on the Fraser Coast.
DRAWCARD: Even if you have a small backyard you can still learn how to attract local wildlife at a number of upcoming workshops on the Fraser Coast.

Call for wildlife workshops heard

THE popularity of past Wildlife Friendly Gardens' Workshops in the region demonstrates just how much the community loves to both garden and attract local wildlife.

And due to a large number of requests for more, Fraser Coast Regional Council, in conjunction with Wildlife Queensland Fraser Coast branch, have announced that another three workshops will be held this year.

Diane Christensen from WQFC said the workshops were a great way to spread the message that even though the size of residential blocks continue to get smaller, gardeners can still attract wildlife to suburbia.

Topics to be discussed include methods of attracting birds, butterflies and frogs to your garden as well as selection and care of native plants.

"The average size of the Aussie backyard has dramatically shrunk from the quarter acre in the 1950s to six hundred square metres in the 2000s," Ms Christensen said.

"As new dwellings are being constructed on cleared land, we are left with a barren backyard.

"However, the tiniest block can be planted with an abundance of plants that will provide a refuge for insects, birds, lizards and small mammals."

Ms Christensen said creating a "lush" garden by planting small trees, shrubs and understory plants was the way to go. "Our native fauna relishes shelter, privacy, food and water.

"When wildlife friendly gardens are nurtured, residents are pleasantly rewarded with visitations of an array of fauna.

"We need to replicate a microcosm of the Australian bush at our residential addresses if we are going to be true protectors of wildlife."

The first workshop will be held at the nursery in the Botanic Gardens in Urangan on Saturday, June 10. This will be followed by a workshop in Lupton Park in Maryborough on August 12 and the last for 2017 at Howard in spring.

All workshops start at 2pm.

Guest speakers include Tina Raveneau, co-ordinator of the Community Environmental Program, Jenny Robin, horticulturalist with Diplomas in Conservation and Land Management, Ruby Rosenfield, experienced birdwatcher and Audrey Sorensen, field naturalist.

Cost is $5 and includes afternoon tea and folder. Bookings to 4128 3992.



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