A law change will allow the State Government to put more cameras on more roads.  Picture: Brian Bennion
A law change will allow the State Government to put more cameras on more roads. Picture: Brian Bennion

Sneaky move means more speed cameras coming to our roads

THE State Government is set to cash in on increased speeding fine revenue amid plans to significantly widen Queensland's speed camera network.

As Queenslanders prepare to return from their Easter long weekend, The Sunday Mail can reveal new laws quietly introduced by the Palaszczuk Government will allow them to put more cameras on more roads.

The legislation will close a loophole that currently prevents the Government from deploying fixed and point-to-point speed cameras on stretches of road with multiple speed limits.

The laws, which are yet to pass Parliament, will also ensure mobile speed cameras can be used on roads that have variable speed limit signs, like the ones introduced on the M1 following the Commonwealth Games.

The Government expects speeding fine revenue will increase in the coming years off the back of plans to increase mobile speed camera hours and boost the number of fixed cameras on the roads.

The LNP has seized on the new legislation, accusing Labor of "leeching" off motorists.

But Transport Minister Mark Bailey said enforcing the speed limit was a necessary part of their road safety strategy to reduce fatalities.

 

A law change will allow the State Government to put more cameras on more roads.  Picture: Brian Bennion
A law change will allow the State Government to put more cameras on more roads. Picture: Brian Bennion

 

"We said in last year's Budget that we would roll out more speed cameras and point-to-point cameras, and these legislative changes will allow us to improve road safety by placing cameras on roads with variable speed limits," he said.

"If motorists stick to the signed speed limit, they won't get fined."

The Government would not reveal where the new cameras would be rolled out, but a Transport Department spokeswoman said locations would be based on analysis of roads with a history of crashes.

"This analysis identifies sites of greatest risk, not revenue streams," she said.

"The increase in mobile speed camera hours and additional fixed cameras are expected to lead to increased infringements and therefore increased revenue projections over coming years."

LNP deputy leader Tim Mander said Labor's priorities were wrong and called for a return of 'speed camera in use' signs for mobile speed cameras.

"The cat is out of the bag, the Palaszczuk Labor Government has admitted their speed camera program is all about revenue raising and not road safety," he said.

"Labor is leeching off motorists already struggling with record car rego bills and higher fuel costs, instead of focusing on road safety."

RACQ's head of technical and safety policy Steve Spalding said there were benefits to deploying point-to-point speed cameras on long stretches of roads with varying speed limits.

"As long as they can do that in a way that doesn't catch the motorist out … it's quite reasonable for them to use them," he said.



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