Clay Clayton from the Post Office Hotel in Maryborough shows the Positive Ticketing cards.
Clay Clayton from the Post Office Hotel in Maryborough shows the Positive Ticketing cards. Jocelyn Watts

Clay may have ticket to harmony

IT’S NOT every day you see a police officer stop a couple of kids in the street to pat them on the back for doing something positive.

That could just become a day-to-day occurrence on the Fraser Coast in the future, however, if a positive ticketing program is introduced by the local police service.

Clay Clayton, owner of the Criterion and Post Office hotels in Maryborough, says the hugely successful program produced by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police could be the solution to “a really big problem with youth coming through”.

It’s one of many ideas that has been put to the Maryborough Safety Network in a bid to curb ongoing violence in the CBD.

“Youths coming through have a lack of respect towards police and authority – it’s a problem everywhere,” Mr Clayton said.

“But if we ran this successful program here on the Fraser Coast, it could revolutionise policing across the entire country.

“It’s a big picture long term initiative, of course, and one in which we would need a firm commitment from the police.”

The positive ticketing program would involve young people across the community being regularly awarded little green tickets by officers for “doing good things” such as wearing their bike helmet, helping police with inquiries or doing volunteer work.

Their ticket would be able to be traded in for a product or service at any participating business in the region.

Maryborough Police District Superintendent Steve Wardrope said the program was definitely something local police would consider introducing.

“We would support it,” he said. “I think it’s a good idea.”

Mr Clayton, who has experienced more than his fair share of youth problems outside his hotels, said he believed the tickets could be very successful.

“I’d like to see it pilot-run right here on the Fraser Coast,” he said.

“It’s focusing on the positive side and rewarding young people for doing good things.

“It’s been very successful in Canada and many countries around the world.”

Positive Ticketing
  • Would see young people awarded little green tickets for doing something positive such as wearing a helmet, holding a door open for someone, helping an elderly person, reporting a significant crime, being well-behaved in a group
  • Tickets would be redeemable for goods and services from participating businesses
  • Would proactively address the detachment youth feel from their community and authority figures through active engagement by police


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