CLIMATE ACTION: Annie Beatty and her daughter Mimi, 9, at Hervey Bay's Global Climate Strike.
CLIMATE ACTION: Annie Beatty and her daughter Mimi, 9, at Hervey Bay's Global Climate Strike. Glen Porteous

CLIMATE STRIKE: 'Not just for long-haired ferals'

AS CHANTS of "no more coal, no more oil, keep the carbon in the soil” rang out over Hervey Bay's Esplanade, Annie Beattie and her daughter, Mimi, walked side-by-side.

The pair marched in support of climate action - a cause, Annie said, was not just for "long-haired feral types”.

"We need everyone to start taking action an individual basis to try and show the government that ordinary people are worried about what's happening,” Annie said.

For Annie, supporting the cause was about protecting the future of the planet for her daughter Mimi, 9.

"I'm worried about the future of the planet because I've got a daughter who's growing up in a world that's pretty uncertain at the moment,” Annie said.

Annie and Mimi were two of about 30 people who joined Hervey Bay's Global Climate Strike march today.

Starting at Scarness Pier, the group marched along the Esplanade towards Torquay, bearing signs and chanting slogans.

Katie Woodward, Dena Fitzgerald and Amy Cattermole at Hervey Bay's climate action march.
Katie Woodward, Dena Fitzgerald and Amy Cattermole at Hervey Bay's climate action march. Glen Porteous

Amy Cattermole, the event organiser, laid out the goals of the climate protest.

"What we want is no new coal, no new gas and no new oil,” she said.

She said the protesters were not trying to put people out of jobs.

"Most importantly, we want those people working in fossil fuels to get a chance to be transitioned into different jobs so we're not leaving them behind,” Amy said.

"We don't want them to feel attacked, left behind or alienated. We want everyone to be included in this because this affects everyone.”

Amy said she had come across mixed views on climate change on the Fraser Coast.

"Some people deny and some don't want to believe it but I think those who have been here for a long time can see the changes that are happening,” she said.

"Most people are worried about their jobs, because they work in the coal industry. Politicians - who knows what's going on with them?

"People might be scared, because it is a big problem and they don't know how to tackle it.”

While the impacts of climate change may not be obvious today, she said, it was important to take action.

"For a lot of people, it's not actually affecting them directly yet,” Amy said.

"We want to do something about it before it gets to the point where we are struggling.”



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