Outback Wrangler Matt Wright in action. The National Geographic star has offered to lend local rangers a hand to catch the Mary River's crocs.
Outback Wrangler Matt Wright in action. The National Geographic star has offered to lend local rangers a hand to catch the Mary River's crocs. DANIEL_GRIFFITHS

Croc wrangler offers help to catch the Mary River's reptiles

MATT Wright has tussled with crocodiles all over the world, from Darwin to Borneo, and he thinks the Fraser Coast might see more of them in the future.

The renowned "outback wrangler" has offered his own take on the growing problem of the Mary River crocodiles.

In between his various television commitments, the National Geographic star first started following the story of Mary Croccins when it was broken by the Chronicle in May.

"I was down around the Sunshine Coast teaching people how to fly helicopters when I first heard about it, and I followed it from there," he said.

Upon hearing the description of the second crocodile spotted in the Mary River this week, Matt thinks we may have a male and a female on our hands.

"They could start breeding," he said.

Matt is in Sydney for television commitments, but he said he'd be happy to come up and help catch the crocodiles if the local rangers asked him to.

"I'd be happy to lend a hand, but I think they'll be fine," he said.

As part of his television show, Outback Wrangler, Matt has conquered television screens by wrestling with all manner of wild creatures, including crocodiles. However, he advised against anyone going out to try and catch either of the local crocs the way he does.

"Leave it to the rangers," he said.

"Even a nine-footer will give you a hell of a bump if you jump on its back," he said, referring to the smaller of the two crocodiles, spotted by fisherman Kevin Greenhalgh, who said it was 9-10ft (2.7-3m) long.

Matt said he thought the rangers would have better luck catching the crocs in a trap now the weather has warmed up.

Matt is known for a more hands-on method of croc catching, though.

Using ropes, darts and duct tape, he subdues the reptiles without relying on baited traps. "If you can see a croc, you can catch it," he said.



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