Mr King was killed along with his fiancee Rahi Hohua. Picture: Joseph King/Facebook
Mr King was killed along with his fiancee Rahi Hohua. Picture: Joseph King/Facebook

Dad’s chilling post hours before death

"SO I woke up this morning nervous as hell about skydiving today. I'm about to conquer my greatest fear. I love everyone."

This was the last Facebook post a nervous but determined Joey King wrote before heading out on his first sky dive with his fiancee Rahi Hohua in 2014.

His friends and family joked around in the comment section that it was "nice meeting him" but they never thought that their lighthearted jokes would soon become reality.

RELATED: Pilot's shock at plane seat on floor before fatal crash

A few hours later, as news spread of a horrific plane crash in Queensland, relatives flocked to Mr King's Facebook post to make it sure wasn't his plane.

Mr King made this Facebook post just hours before the fatal crash. Picture: Joseph King/Facebook
Mr King made this Facebook post just hours before the fatal crash. Picture: Joseph King/Facebook

"Cuz hope it wasn't you's (sic) on that plane! Let us know," one person commented.

"Omg Joseph King that wasn't your plane, was it," another said, while others begged for information.

Mr King and Ms Hohua were killed along with skydiving instructors Glenn Norman and Juraj Glesk and pilot Andrew Aitkin.

Grieving family members gathered in Brisbane this week for an inquest into their deaths and what caused the plane to crash.

Mr King was killed along with his fiancee Rahi Hohua. Picture: Joseph King/Facebook
Mr King was killed along with his fiancee Rahi Hohua. Picture: Joseph King/Facebook

Mr King and Ms Hohua had five children between them and their families were on their way to watch the jump when the plane crashed into the ground.

The accident was witnessed by more than a dozen pilots who told the Australian Transport Safety Bureau the plane stalled 150 feet in the air before twisting to left and plummeting into the runway.

The investigation was inconclusive but initial reports suggested a faulty seat may have led to the pilot losing control of the aircraft at Caboolture Airfield.

Legal teams inspect a Cessna 206 plane as part of the inquest. Picture: Dan Peled/AAP
Legal teams inspect a Cessna 206 plane as part of the inquest. Picture: Dan Peled/AAP

The inquest heard at least three mechanisms to prevent the pilot's seat failing were absent.

A stopper to prevent the pilot's seat sliding backwards on its rails was missing and may have led to Mr Aitken losing access to the controls, investigator Eric Blankenstein told the Brisbane inquest.

A secondary device to stop unwanted movement was also unfitted.

Mr Blankenstein said it would have been "almost impossible" for Mr Aitken to stop himself sliding back on his own with no seat stop.

Coroner Terry Ryan is set to determine whether he will make any recommendations to improve skydiving procedures in Queensland.



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