The Give Way sign which is the subject of residents’ concerns.
The Give Way sign which is the subject of residents’ concerns.

Intersection can have a Stop sign

THE FRASER Coast council’s CEO Andrew Brien has the absolute power to install a Stop sign on the Tinana intersection where 17-year-old Adrian Hope died on December 28.

But despite calls from concerned locals for the stop sign Mr Brien won’t give the go-ahead.

And eight months after the council carried out a formal traffic study on the killer intersection, Mr Brien now says he is passing on the alarming results of that survey to the police.

“The traffic count indicates that some vehicles are speeding along Teddington Road. This will be passed on to the police,” Mr Brien said on Thursday in a written response to the Chronicle’s emailed questions about his reasons for not installing a Stop sign.

In our request for a response we pointed out that council’s own survey revealed motorists were travelling through the intersection at an average speed of 85kmh.

The CEO has been using the Main Roads traffic control devices manual as his reason for not changing the existing Give Way sign to a Stop sign.

He says the intersection does not meet the criteria set out in the manual.

He is right. It doesn’t.

But yesterday the Chronicle checked with the State Government and discovered that the council is entitled to deviate from the manual – except for perhaps changing the red of the standard Stop sign to pink or purple.

“They own the road network,” a senior staffer said. “They can use their discretion. They don’t have to follow to the letter what is written in that manual.”

Mr Brien told the Chronicle on Thursday that under the manual, a Stop sign could be installed if the criteria for a Give Way sign could not be met.

“The criteria for a Give Way sign at the intersection are in accordance with the MUTCD.”

Mr Brien said that last December the council had placed conditions on a developer planning to turn one lot in Iindah Road East into 143 residential blocks and those conditions included the developer putting in a roundabout.

But when the Chronicle checked on the developer’s schedule yesterday we learned that stage one of the development will not start until April this year and that it will likely not be completed for six months after that.

“I am still willing to meet with residents,” Mr Brien said.

“The council takes very seriously its responsibility for traffic safety and regularly investigates concerns raised by residents.

“The former Maryborough City Council lowered the speed limit on Iindah Road in 2006 in response to residents’ requests.”



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