Flowers have been placed on a giveway sign at the intersection of Iindah and Teddington roads where Adrian Hope was killed in a two-car smash on December 28. Nearby residents are lobbying to have the sign replaced with a Stop sign.
Flowers have been placed on a giveway sign at the intersection of Iindah and Teddington roads where Adrian Hope was killed in a two-car smash on December 28. Nearby residents are lobbying to have the sign replaced with a Stop sign. Jocelyn Watts

Council refuse stop sign

A STOP sign will not be installed at the busy intersection that claimed the life of Maryborough teenager Adrian Hope – because it does not meet a certain criteria.

Following an investigation of the Iindah and Teddington roads intersection, Fraser Coast Regional Council CEO Andrew Brien yesterday announced while “we are sorry for the loss and heartache which has resulted from the recent tragedy ... unfortunately we cannot install stop signs at every intersection where there has been a fatal accident”.

He said the intersection in Tinana did not meet the criteria under the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices.

Residents of Teddington Road, such as Denis Kettle, last week called on the council to replace Give Way signs with Stop signs.

They believed a Stop Sign could have prevented the tragic accident on December 28 in which Adrian and his 17-year-old girlfriend, who was driving the couple along Iindah Road, crossed paths with a ute at the intersection after possibly missing the Give Way sign.

“We’ve been here 17 years and there have been more accidents than we’d like to count,” he said.

“People go through the Give Way signs without looking all the time. The intersection isn’t well lit up or marked.”

Mr Brien said of the past nine years there had been five crashes, including the fatal accident, at the intersection.

Of the four non-fatal accidents only one resulted in injuries.

“It is understandable that residents of the area believe that the installation of a Stop sign will improve safety at the intersection.

“To be consistent across all roads and so that all drivers understand the importance of a stop sign, they are only installed when the road meets set criteria such as high traffic numbers or poor visibility.

“If drivers are forced to stop at intersections where they do not believe it is warranted then they start to ignore the signs.”

Mr Brien said following resident’s requests in August last year, the current Give Way signs and warning signs were installed on both arms of Iindah Road approaching the intersection in October.

There were also Cross Road Ahead warning signs installed on Teddington Road.

“From what we understand from media reports is that residents are concerned about vehicles speeding and ignoring the giveaway sign,” Mr Brien said.

“We urge residents to contact the police to let them know when drivers are speeding. The police deploy resources based on feed back from the public and can take action if they know there is a problem.

“The council can help the police map road use by installing automated vehicle counters. The counters register the time of travel, direction and vehicle speeds which helps the police build up a picture of road use.

“If there is a consistent problem then the police can target it.”

Adrian’s funeral was held at the Maryborough Crematorium on Wednesday.



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