BE PREPARED: Moetu Hill, 4 with baby sister Jasmine, 1 recently learned how to call 000 at day care, and it was a lesson well learned.
BE PREPARED: Moetu Hill, 4 with baby sister Jasmine, 1 recently learned how to call 000 at day care, and it was a lesson well learned. Mike Richards GLA170416EMGC

Emergency call lesson turns 'real life' for baby sister

FOUR-year-old Moetu Hill only recently learned how to call triple zero in emergency situations at daycare, but she never expected her mother would have to dial it days later for her baby sister, Jasmine.

Her lessons were put into real life practice on April 9 when mum Letita Hill called the ambulance after Jasmine started to have a seizure.

Moetu was having a sleepover at her grandparents place at the time, but thanks to the emergency service information classes she knew exactly what the ambulance visit meant.

Jasmine had been having high fevers as a result of a bad stomach bug for the past two days, and was barely eating or drinking.

All of a sudden the one-year-old started to have a seizure.

"My husband rushed home while I called the ambulance," she said.

"We have dealt with seizures before so we had an idea of what to do, but it was still very scary, she wasn't responding and she had started turning blue."

The ambulance arrived and took Jasmine to the Gladstone Hospital, and she is now happy, healthy and back at home.

Mrs Hill said she was glad Moetu recently had the emergency service education, so she understood what happened when she was told the next day.

"She was shocked and couldn't really understand how it had happened in 'real life'.

"But I'm glad Moetu wasn't there at the time and that it wasn't her who had to make the call.

"She's very young and the more emergencies you can avoid at a young age, the better."

Mrs Hill said the ambulance workers who tended to their daughter were 'amazing'.

"They were very calm and explained everything to me," she said.

"I felt that my daughter was in very safe hands."

The Hill family moved to Gladstone in 2009, and had not heard many positive things about the hospital.

"But once they got to our house and calmed us down, I could see how much they really cared about my daughter," she said.

"Then at the hospital with the staff, we felt looked after and we knew everything was going to be okay.

"It's really nice to be able to put that kind of faith and trust in the Gladstone hospital and emergency workers."



 



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