STUDENTS: Norma Robinson and Kellie Curtis are all smiles despite their
STUDENTS: Norma Robinson and Kellie Curtis are all smiles despite their "injuries". Carlie Walker

Fake injuries helping students learn

WITH blood pouring from their cheeks and cuts and abrasions on their bodies, at first it's like walking into a room where a major catastrophe has taken place.

Fortunately, though, none of the wounds are real - they are simply part of a very realistic simulation aimed at helping medical students perfect their training.

A  moulage workship was held at Hervey Bay Rural Clinical School in Urraween yesterday, with medical students learning how to apply mock wounds, injuries or manifestations of medical conditions to increase the realism of a simulation.

Whether it was a simulation of a heart attack or a car crash, it was aimed at making the situation as realistic as possible ahead of students being involved in treating actual traumas, lead clinical educator Jules Bennet said.

"The students practice making wounds to use them in our simulations," she said.

The use of simulation in nursing, medicine and allied health was aimed at improving learning and skills.

Brandon Richardson with his very realistic looking fake burn.
Brandon Richardson with his very realistic looking fake burn. Carlie Walker

Ms Bennet said the realistic wounds ensured the students would have an emotional response, similar to that which could be expected if it was a real trauma.

Among those learning the techniques of moulage were third and fourth year medical students, who had chosen to complete the workshop as part of their simulation elective.

Later the students would take part in bigger simulations where they would be part of the medical response, Ms Bennet said, with scenarios varying from a shark bite to an asthma attack.

During the simulated events, medical students could practise their skills on mannequins and simulated patients.

"It's a good place to make mistakes," Ms Bennet said, adding that it was all part of preparing students for the real thing.

A variety of utensils were placed in front of the students, from fake blood to powders and paints, all in the hopes of making the most realistic wounds possible.

Some had "injuries" to their hands or heads, while Brandon Richardson, with the help of an instructor, demonstrated how to create a very realistic burn.

At the end of the tutorial, Mr Richardson was left with an injury that looked like it needed urgent treatment.

TraumaSim carried out the workshop at the school yesterday, with students coming from across the Wide Bay and Toowoomba to take part.

The students learned how to create bruising, rashes, create cuts and abrasion and burns of various depths.

They also learned how to sculpt silicone wounds, apply pre-made wounds and dress up a wound to enhance realism.
 



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