Lindsay Titmarsh and his grandson Josh at the site on the Tandora property where crocodile tracks have been seen.
Lindsay Titmarsh and his grandson Josh at the site on the Tandora property where crocodile tracks have been seen. Annie Perets

Farmer: 'Someone will be eaten by a croc'

AFTER a big wet, a series of linear scratches often appear in mud just 100m away from Lindsay Titmarsh's home on the banks of the Mary River.  

The cattle grazier is adamant they are crocodile tracks and proof the reptile not only lives but also breeds in the region.  

He fears it is a matter of time before someone is attacked - whether while fishing or standing too close to the bank. 

Crocodile trail left behind at Alligator Creek, just 100m from the Tandora homestead.
Crocodile trail left behind at Alligator Creek, just 100m from the Tandora homestead. Contributed

  Ms Titmarsh's family has lived at the cattle station Tandora for more than 100 years.  

There, a freshwater dam, complete with home-made diving boards, has been the place of many happy memories.   

But now, at 70, Mr Titmarsh won't let his grandchildren go into the dam in case crocodiles have moved in.   

Last year, about a dozen crocodile sightings were reported on the Fraser Coast but rangers were not able to locate any of them.   

Despite confirmed sightings in the past and the removal two problem crocodiles from the Mary River in the past five years, the Department of Environment and Science lists the risk of human-crocodile interaction on the Fraser Coast as low.  

Crocodile traps are occasionally set-up at the Mary River.   

Last year, Mr Titmarsh discovered tracks which he believed to belong to both adult and juvenile crocodiles, leading him to believe crocodiles this far south were capable of breeding.   

One footprint was been measured to be 10cm wide.   

In 2012, Mr Titmarsh saw and photographed a 3.8m male crocodile near Beaver Rock, just 2kms from his property.   This crocodile was relocated to a crocodile farm.   

While the salt-water dam on Mr Titmarsh's property is currently dry, he expects to see more crocodile tracks in the aftermath of the next wet weather event.   

Crocodile numbers have continued to increase in Northern and Central Queensland since hunting was banned in the 70s.   

Controversial Federal MP Bob Katter has repeatedly called for a crocodile cull.   

In the lead up to the 2017 State Election, Queensland's LNP campaigned on the promise problem crocodiles and any found south of Gladstone would be shot and killed.   

The State Government has refused to consider a cull.   

Mr Titmarsh fears if action is not urgently taken, the region risks becoming infested by crocodiles.  

"It's a matter of time before someone is eaten," Mr Titmarsh said.   

"In 20 or 30 years from now, when Fraser Coast waterways are infested with unwanted crocodiles like those from central and northern Queensland are, the children of tomorrow will seriously question the intelligence of the decision makers of today." 



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