IT LOOKS like the scene of a horror crash at the Maryborough Showgrounds but North Coast regional firefighters are practicing for worst-case scenarios.

The scenario using recreations of real-life incidents, imaginary crashes and "jobs you really don't want to go to" had been set up for Queensland Fire and Emergency Services heavy vehicle rescue training.

Maryborough Fire Station manager Shaun Murphy has co-ordinated the annual training facilities for up to 40 firefighters who will learn new skills and refine old skills at the fake crashes until the end of February.

"The scenarios are based on jobs we have been to, sometimes we don't get it exactly right the first time so we like to come back and make sure that if it does happen again we do get it exactly right the second time," Mr Murphy said.

"Sometimes the scenarios are based on imagination and some are jobs you don't really want to go to, and then you train for them as well."

Mr Murphy said they started with a vacant piece of land and put the props in place.

A firefighter works on a windscreen during heavy vehicle rescue training at the Maryborough showgrounds.
A firefighter works on a windscreen during heavy vehicle rescue training at the Maryborough showgrounds. Valerie Horton

"We do have these sorts of accidents and that's why we have to train for these scenarios.

"It's always tough when you have people trapped in a car and especially with the weight of a bus on top - you take the real emotion of there are uncomfortable people trapped in the car.

"There are a whole lot of dangers to have deal with for stabilisation so that makes it all the more difficult."

QFRS North Coast region inspector Michael Corser said it was a tough job to keep up with.

"There is a lot to learn, a lot to know, the guys have to be efficient with the equipment otherwise it's not safe and not going to work properly," he said.

"Cars are changing all the time and we do need to know how they are built and what safety features they have like air bags.

"If they haven't been deployed during the accident, we can start cutting the car apart then actually deploy an airbag which can hurt the occupant even more or injuring one of our own people and we don't need any more injuries than what is on the scene.

"A good result is getting people out with minor injuries as possible - we don't want to make their injuries any worse."

Mr Murphy asked drivers to take care "especially now we are back at school - but all the time".



BREAKING: Paramedics at scene of M’boro crash

Premium Content BREAKING: Paramedics at scene of M’boro crash

The crash happened at a busy intersection

Man on attempted murder charge stays behind bars

Premium Content Man on attempted murder charge stays behind bars

No bail application for man charged with alleged stabbing attack

WET WEATHER: How much rain fell across the Coast

Premium Content WET WEATHER: How much rain fell across the Coast

Steady rain has fallen across the Fraser Coast