Helen Grevell will race her late husband Peter’s pigeons this year.
Helen Grevell will race her late husband Peter’s pigeons this year. Valerie Horton

Flying in memory of husband

HELEN Grevell knew when she walked down the aisle to marry her husband Peter that he also had another love in his life.

She wasn’t jealous even though his other love was a bird - as it was one of the feathered variety.

Peter was a member of the Maryborough Racing Pigeon Club and he loved his winged warriors.

Helen wasn’t fussed on the pigeons, but she wasn’t about to let it get in the way of true love.

So the pair built a nest in Maryborough together and raised two sons, Aaron and Tim, as well as countless babies of the feathered variety during their 28 years of marriage.

Life was great until tragedy struck just over a month ago when prostrate cancer claimed Peter’s life.

“Feathers”, as he was known, was only 59.

There are many memories of her husband around her home, but the most significant one is in the backyard.

Helen now has a loft full of pigeons and she’s now determined to do something to make Peter proud.

She’s going to race his beloved pigeons this season, something she said would be a new experience for her.

“I never raced pigeons before – I was always his offsider,” she said.

“Peter took care of the racing.

"They were his little babies.

“Now he’s gone and they need someone to take care of them and I will.

“I wouldn’t have it any other way – it’s what we as a family want to do for him.”

But how did her husband get into pigeon racing in the first place?

“He got his first pigeon when he was 14 when his father had been working out bush and came across a stray bird,” Helen said.

“He took it home and gave it to Peter and that’s when it all began.

“Peter loved pigeons from that day on.

“Although pigeons were his passion, that didn’t stop him from being a great husband and father and we had a great life together and I miss him dearly.”



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