This female dingo had her ear damaged by an ear tag.
This female dingo had her ear damaged by an ear tag. Contributed

Fraser Island dingo group calls for an end to ear tagging

IT'S the photo that Save the Fraser Island Dingoes advocate Karin Kilpatrick believes the Fraser Coast public should see.

A female dingo, its ear split in half, the damage caused by an ear tag that has been ripped out.

Neil Cambourn, an executive director with the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service, maintained the ear-tagging methods used by rangers on the island were in accordance with guidelines approved by Animal Ethics.

"This pictured female dingo has successfully reared four pups and appears to show signs she has another litter," he said.

But Ms Kilpatrick said the dingo's health was believed to have declined.

There had also been suggestions the dingo had lost pups this season because her milk had dried up.

"People who saw her said she and another dingo were in pretty bad shape and also had stiff legs," she said.

The group had hoped the State Government would decide not to use ear tags any more after a dingo management strategy review.

The group hoped the government would at least decide to leave ear tagging until the animals were 12 months old, Ms Kilpatrick said.

But ear tagging is still part of the dingo management plan, used on dingoes weighing 10kg or more, leaving the group frustrated and seeking support from veterinary experts on the subject.



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