WAG slammed for 'wellness' workshops. Picture: Instagram / Tays Ways
WAG slammed for 'wellness' workshops. Picture: Instagram / Tays Ways

Fury at anti-vax WAG’s $2k ‘joke’

A FOOTY WAG who is known for her controversial anti-vax stance is copping backlash again - this time for her latest "wellness" program.

Taylor Winterstein, who is married to NRL star Frank Winterstein, recently launched an eight-week online "coaching" course called "Liberate Her", offering advice on topics such as "holistic nutrition", "low-tox living" and "medical freedom".

She's also launched a second course, "Break Up With Your Bulls**t" with her twin sister Stevie, discussing topics from motherhood, relationships and sex to identity, body, intuition and money.

According to Mrs Winterstein's blog, the courses aim to "break mainstream" medical advice and practices, though neither women hold any medical qualifications.

WAG Taylor Winterstein and her twin sister Stevie have been slammed by experts for their 'wellness' workshops. Picture: Instagram / Tays Ways
WAG Taylor Winterstein and her twin sister Stevie have been slammed by experts for their 'wellness' workshops. Picture: Instagram / Tays Ways


But the controversial classes, which cost as much as $2222, have been slammed by experts.

"They're going to be trying to indoctrinate young parents and particularly mothers in misinformation and fear, which is a shame," Melbourne surgeon John Cunningham told A Current Affair.

"We've got a measles outbreak at the moment in New Zealand that's spreading over to Australia, and real children are getting real diseases that they just shouldn't need to experience."

Mrs Winterstein is married to NRL star Frank Winterstein and is an outspoken anti-vaxxer. Picture: Instagram/Tays Ways
Mrs Winterstein is married to NRL star Frank Winterstein and is an outspoken anti-vaxxer. Picture: Instagram/Tays Ways

Mrs Winterstein - who has been public about her decision not immunise her children Ziggy and Hendrix, despite it being mandatory under the "No Jab, No Play" legislation - promotes her workshops through her Instagram page, where she has almost 25,000 followers.

In a promotional video, she describes her teachings as a resource for giving mums "access to tools and leading experts you need to stand fiercely strong and confident in your choices".

Participants receive regular phone calls, private Facebook live chats and access to a WhatsApp group.

On Facebook, the response to the segment has been divided, with some backing Mrs Winterstein as others describe the life-coaching workshops as "a joke".

A joint Instagram account for both the women talks openly about their vaccination concerns. Picture: Instagram/Stevie and Tay
A joint Instagram account for both the women talks openly about their vaccination concerns. Picture: Instagram/Stevie and Tay

"So glad that their dangerous and idiotic ways are being exposed," one person said.

"What a joke they obviously just want money well go get a real job," another wrote.

"This is total nonsense," a commenter added.

Many also described the workshops as a "scam", questioning who would pay money for "delusional nonsense".

Mrs Winterstein runs many different programs, ‘educating’ mums on an alternative way of living that’s not backed by science or medical professional. Picture: Instagram / Tays Ways
Mrs Winterstein runs many different programs, ‘educating’ mums on an alternative way of living that’s not backed by science or medical professional. Picture: Instagram / Tays Ways

But not everyone agreed, some saying Mrs Winterstein's product was "amazing".

In a post on Instagram, Mrs Winterstein addressed the concerns aired, describing herself as "fearless" in her pursuit of the truth.

 

 

It's not the first time Mrs Winterstein has come under fire, with the mum-of-two copping serious flak for claiming she can cure a range of illnesses with a $150 "miracle powder".

The self-proclaimed "health warrior" claimed back in April that the product called PXP Royale, had a number of health benefits that can help with pain, migraines, autism symptoms and improve eyesight.

But it was described by experts as ground-up rice that had "nothing magic about it".

News.com.au has contacted Taylor Winterstein for comment.



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