Our power supply is RUBBISH!

HUNDREDS of homes on the Fraser Coast are now being powered by rubbish.

The methane gas from your baby's dirty nappies and Chinese takeaway containers is being collected from the Maryborough landfill site and converted into a cleaner source of power for about 300 homes nearby.

Landfill Gas Industries (LGI) managing director Adam Bloomer said the one $3 million biogas engine generated the same power as 15,000 solar panels.

There is enough gas in the Maryborough site to power those homes for 20 years, which Mr Bloomer described as a "win-win" for people in the area.

CLEAN ENERGY: Landfill Gas Industries managing director Adam Bloomer stands in front of the $3 million biogas engine.
CLEAN ENERGY: Landfill Gas Industries managing director Adam Bloomer stands in front of the $3 million biogas engine. Eliza Wheeler

"It helps with the removal of landfill odour," Mr Bloomer said.

"It removes it from the environment where it can cause pollution and becomes a good source of energy."

Because the landfill gas is mixed in with other types of energy; solar, coal and water, it does not cost customers or Ergon any more money than traditional methods.

This use of landfill gas for power is already being used in parts of Brisbane and the Gold Coast, but this is the first time it has been used in regional Queensland.

Ergon Acting Chief Executive Roslyn Baker said this was part of an exciting new trend where local councils were looking to extract landfill gas resulting from decaying organic compounds buried underground to produce a renewable energy source.

The councils could then put the green credits earned from the projects towards offsetting their carbon footprint.

LGI chief operating officer Jarryd Doran said a second generator was planned for Hervey Bay; doubling the amount of homes to be powered by the gas.

"We're hoping to have it soon but it depends on a number of factors," Mr Doran said.

"Like the volume of waste and when Ergon is ready to receive the power from the second engine."

GAS TO POWER

1. The gas is sucked up from the buried landfill and fed into the biogas engine.

2. The gas is filtered and sent to the Maryborough Ergon Energy Neptune St feeder line, where it is distributed to the homes.

What do you think about using bio gas for power? Join the conversation and tell us below. 



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