The water level in Ululah Lagoon is dropping rapidly, with some saying it is at its lowest level in 60 years.
The water level in Ululah Lagoon is dropping rapidly, with some saying it is at its lowest level in 60 years. KARLEILA THOMSEN

How low can Ululah go?

IF YOU’RE heading to Ululah Lagoon any time soon to feed the ducks, be prepared to walk a little further to find them.

Shallow sections of the lagoon between Anzac Park and the Maryborough Golf Club have dried up, forcing birdlife to stray away from their usual haunts.

“It’s the lowest anyone’s ever seen it,” said golf club president Kim McKenna, who has been watching the lagoon’s water level steadily drop over the past couple of months.

“Some people are even saying it’s the lowest they’ve seen it in 60 years.”

The Fraser Coast Regional Council has also recognised Ululah Lagoon is at its lowest point in many years and has this week seized the opportunity to carry out some maintenance de-silting.

“We will be increasing the capacity of the lagoon by removing silt from the Anzac Park side of the lagoon,” said executive manager of environment sustainability and open space, Jamie Cockburn.

“This will benefit the lagoon by increasing holding capacity as well as improving the general amenity.

“Unfortunately, until we do get rain the excavation area will be unsightly.”

Mr Cockburn said the Anzac Park car park of Alice Street would be closed to make room for the heavy machinery while silt was being removed from the lagoon.

He said all silt removed would be carted to the Maryborough landfill off Saltwater Creek Road.

Meanwhile, council staff members are also monitoring the lagoon in Hervey Bay’s botanic gardens which has reached its lowest water level of many years.

“If the water level drops too low we could top it up with bore or potable water,” said parks officer David Roberts.



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