REFUSED TRANSPORT: Paul Isaksson is angry after having to drive his wife Kim Isaksson to Brisbane for brain surgery because there is no emergency transport available. Photo: Zach Hogg / NewsMail
REFUSED TRANSPORT: Paul Isaksson is angry after having to drive his wife Kim Isaksson to Brisbane for brain surgery because there is no emergency transport available. Photo: Zach Hogg / NewsMail Zach Hogg

Husband's emergency drive

TRUCK driver Paul Isaksson says the system has failed him after he was forced to drive his seriously ill wife to hospital in Brisbane himself.

Mr Isaksson said his wife Kim had a condition where the fluid in her brain does not drain properly.

About two months ago she had an operation to have a shunt put in to her head to take the fluid away.

He said his wife was used to managing the condition, which she had had for 27 years.

"She had 17 operations when we lived in Sydney," he said.

Recently she realised something was wrong, but after a trip to the Bundaberg Hospital she was told she just had a headache.

On Friday night two weeks ago Mr Isaksson decided something was badly wrong and took his wife to the Bundaberg Hospital.

"We saw an intern there who said he didn't know what he was looking at," he said.

"He talked to a neurosurgeon at the Princess Alexandra Hospital who said she had to be taken straight there."

The neurosurgeon had diagnosed Mr Isaksson's wife with a broken shunt.

Mr Isaksson said he was told at the hospital the problem was they did not know when they could organise the aircraft to take his wife to Brisbane.

"They said it could be tomorrow or the next day, or maybe Monday," he said.

He said there was even a suggestion his wife could take a six-hour train ride to Brisbane.

"My biggest fear was she could meningitis through what was an open wound," he said.

Mr Isaksson said he was given a supply of surgical dressings and gloves so he could change his wife's dressings.

About 3am the pair left the hospital, and Mr Isaksson decided the only way he could ensure getting his wife to Brisbane was to drive her there himself.

The journey took about six hours, with frequent stops to check his wife's condition and change her dressings.

"We don't live in a third world country," Mr Isaksson said.

"This is ridiculous."

Mr Isaksson said by the time they got to the Princess Alexandra his wife was semi-conscious, and was operated on the next day.

The NewsMail was not able to get comment from Queensland Health on Mr Isaksson's allegations.



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