Queensland wicket-keeper and rising young star Beth Mooney.
Queensland wicket-keeper and rising young star Beth Mooney.

Beth Mooney is a stand out

IF AND when Australian and Queensland women’s cricket captain Jodie Fields hangs up her wicket keeping gloves, Hervey Bay’s Beth Mooney knows who would love to take over – herself.

If the 15-year-old continues to impress the way she has been then she might just do that.

The Xavier Catholic College student is one of the rising young stars in the game today.

She’s a member of the Australian under-18 women’s squad, the vice-captain of the state under 17 team and she was the captain for the state under 15 team.

Mooney is also one of the rookies in the squad for the state women’s team, the Queensland Fire, for the 2009-10 season.

The state under 17 team will contest the nationals in Brisbane next month but Mooney has already been on state duty this season.

She was the wicket-keeper for the Queensland Academy of Sport women’s team that finished third in the Cricket Australia Cup in Sydney.

Queensland Cricket Regional Cricket Manager for Wide Bay, Hervey Bay’s Andy Richards, said Mooney had once again shown her class in the games in Sydney.

“Beth had a really good carnival with both her bat and her gloves,” Richards, who works with Mooney at least twice a week, said.

“She took some great catches and made some top-class stumpings.”

It was the sort of display Richards said keeps Mooney heading in the right direction.

“It’s why she is the number two wicketkeeper in the state and without doubt the best in the country in her age group,” Richards said.

“She has got a huge future in the game and when Jodie (Fields) gives the game away I am sure Beth will be there to step into her shoes.”

As for Mooney, who plays for the Mariners A-grade men’s team in the Fraser Coast Cricket competition whenever time and commitments allow, she’s just happy to keep playing the best she can.

“I’d love nothing more than to play for Australia and Queensland – that would be a dream come true,” Mooney, who started playing the game when she was seven while growing up in Victoria, said.

“I’ll just keep working hard on my game and see what happens in the future because I’ve got a lot of time on my side.”

Apart from her ability with her gloves, Mooney has shown plenty of promise when she has a bat in her hands.

She has already scored two representative hundreds, the best being 115 not out off just 69 balls while playing for Wide Bay in the Queensland Championships last year



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