It's probably healthy to be cynical about Valentine's Day

EDITORIAL: It is easy - and probably healthy - to be cynical about Valentine's Day.

Some would say its primary purpose is to stimulate not romantic instincts but the retail economy, which is not in itself a bad thing.

But there is so much pressure on young people.

Add to that the pressure (mainly on young men) to suddenly be romantic heroes, with wallets fat enough to carry it off and skin thick enough to handle rejection.

Then add the pressure (mainly on young women) to have someone who cares enough to make the big, romantic gesture.

That's a recipe for self-measured failure, miserable February 15 hangovers and even depression.

The course of true love never did run smooth, as Shakespeare - and Thursday's front page - indicated.

But on the other hand, perhaps Valentine's Day is a publicly accepted opportunity for people young and old to openly declare something hidden.

It is a time when people talk about love.

That can't be bad either.

So here are some more words about love: romantic love can be intoxicating, volatile, overwhelming, fleeting, devastating.

But there can come a time when love becomes quieter but even stronger, when after decades of marriage her lightest touch on your forearm still tingles, when the thought of being held in his arms can occupy your whole day, when your definition of home and happiness is wherever he or she is.

So from this cynical romantic, Happy Valentine's Day.



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