UPDATE: Pleas for tourists to stay away from dingoes

UPDATE: An activist has pleaded with tourists to be cautious of wildlife on Fraser Island after the State Government announced it had destroyed a dingo for displaying aggressive behaviour.

The dingo had bitten a woman and child in two separate incidents between June 30 and July 1 at Lake Wabby and Eurong.

Karin Kilpatrick from Save the Fraser Island Dingoes shared her frustration with the Chronicle on Wednesday.

She said too often visitors approached the dingoes hoping for an interaction, causing the normally shy animals to become habituated.

Ms Kilpatrick said the dingoes were not like the family pet and children should not be allowed to go near the animals on the island.

Ms Kilpatrick said people need to keep a safe distance and give the animals a wide berth, both for their own safety and for the protection of the dingoes.

"The dingo was only 12 months old, barely 12 months old," Ms Kilpatrick, adding that it would have been born around July last year.

EARLIER: A dingo has been destroyed on Fraser Island after it bit a woman and a child.

A spokeswoman from the Department of Environment and Science said the dingo was euthanised after a woman was bitten by the dingo at Lake Wabby on June 30, a child was bitten at Eurong on July 1 and after it displayed aggressive behaviour towards a female backpacker on July 2.

The dingo was euthanised later that day.

The department only publicly released the information this week.

The decision to destroy the dingo was made with the support of the Butchulla Aboriginal Corporation after it was determined that the dingo posed an unacceptable risk.

Karin Kilpatrick from Save the Fraser Island Dingoes told the Chronicle the dingo was believed to be about 12 months old.

She urged visitors to the island to give the dingoes a wide berth in order to prevent incidents like the ones that resulted in the dingo having to be euthanised.

Signs warming of the presence dingoes have been placed throughout the tourism hotspot.

Dingoes on the eastern beach of Fraser Island.

Photo: Alistair Brightman / Fraser Coast Chronicle
Dingoes on the eastern beach of Fraser Island. Photo: Alistair Brightman / Fraser Coast Chronicle Alistair Brightman FRA090411ding

Ms Kilpatrick said the dingoes were not like the family pet and children should not be allowed to go near the animals.

The DES spokeswoman said the dingo was identified by its coloured and numbered ear tag.

"While the euthanasia was unfortunate, it was necessary, and it is not expected to have an impact on the population's genetics as the dingo was part of a pack," she said.

"Rangers had previously been monitoring a pack of dingoes in the area and had issued warnings to visitors and residents due to increased dingo activity."

The dingo is the first to have been euthanised on the island so far this year.

Wongai, One Tree Rocks and Cornwells camping areas have been temporarily closed from June 12 to September 20 to reduce the risk of habituation and interactions between dingoes and visitors.

Rangers have also stepped up patrols and warnings in the Eurong-Poyungan Rocks area.



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