Opinion

Kittens and terror - it doesn’t make sense

OPINION: One day you're wielding an AK47, a dagger and a grenade, the next you're mourning the loss of your cute ginger kitten.

So it is for 16-year-old British schoolgirl Zahra Halane, who has shared a series of tweets via her Twitter account since she decided to join Islamic State militants in Syria, becoming a jihadi bride.

She took to the social media website after her obviously insensitive jihadist husband "threw" her ginger kitten outside.

The cat went missing and, like any 16-year-old, Zahra decided to share her complaint with the world.

It's hard not to be amused by the juxtaposition - the horror of a young girl deciding to join a violent terrorist organisation, coupled with the evidence she is, indeed, just a child.

It's harder to be amused by the idea that more and more people, especially children, are getting caught up in the extremism of this terrorist organisation.

Zahra's twin sister Salma is also in Syria, also part of the terrorist movement.

The two are said to have been radicalised over the internet and attempts by their parents to bring them home have failed.

It is estimated 60 to 70 Australians have joined the fight in the Middle East and that fact has played a part in the decision to raise Australia's terror alert level from medium to high.

I can understand the parents of these girls wanting to bring their children back to Britain; and no doubt some Australian families hope their loved ones realise the grave error they have made and return.

But I don't believe they should be allowed to return to the countries they have betrayed.

The risk is simply too great.

Topics:  carlie walker islamic kitten opinion syria terrorism terrorist



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