Fisherman Kev Greenhalgh, the man who alerted the Queensland Parks and Wildlife of the crocodile in the Mary River in May, says there are now two of the reptiles.
Fisherman Kev Greenhalgh, the man who alerted the Queensland Parks and Wildlife of the crocodile in the Mary River in May, says there are now two of the reptiles. Karleila Thomsen

Legend continues with reports of two crocs in Mary River

IT APPEARS the crafty Mary River crocodile, which has for months avoided rangers' trapping attempts, may have found a new companion, possibly a lover.

Rumours two of the reptiles had been sunning themselves on the river's banks surfaced last month and they have continued to grow louder and louder with commercial fishing operators now adamant the famous croc is far from alone.

Kevin Greenhalgh, the fisherman responsible for the original sighting in May, said he was similarly certain about the presence of a new resident reptile in the Fraser Coast.

"One is dark in colour and about 12-14ft (3.6-4.2m) long, the big one," Mr Greenhalgh told the Chronicle.

"And the other one is about 9-10ft (2.7-3m) long and he's a khaki colour, a bit of a lighter colour, so there is definitely two there."

Mr Greenhalgh said the smaller reptile had made its home slightly downstream from the other one and closer to the Beaver Rock boat ramp. It's not known if the pair's close proximity is a coincidence.



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