WILLIAM AMIET: (On the left) saw action in late June 1917 in the Bapaume area of France, and was made 2nd lieutenant on August 1, 1918.
WILLIAM AMIET: (On the left) saw action in late June 1917 in the Bapaume area of France, and was made 2nd lieutenant on August 1, 1918. University Of Queensland

Maryborough heroes more than soldiers

NOT all Anzacs were career-soldiers; some were doctors, farmers and even lawyers before they joined the war.

The Supreme Court Library of Queensland's Anzac exhibition 'In Freedom's Cause' tells the stories of 82 lawyer-soldiers who fought in the First World War, including six men who lived in Maryborough.

Five of the Maryborough men studied and another taught at Maryborough Boys Grammar School, now Maryborough State High School.

Supreme Court librarian David Bratchford said the exhibition gave visitors a unique opportunity to gain an insight into these soldiers' lives.

"To coincide with the exhibition, a new commemorative publication produced in collaboration with the Federal Court of Australia tells the stories of 82 lawyer-soldiers," Mr Bratchford said.

"We greatly appreciate the support of the families of the lawyer-soldiers and the assistance of our current colleagues who helped us to bring these important stories to a wider audience."

Henry Lionel Harvey: Born in Maryborough on October 6, 1886, he was the eldest of seven sons of Henry Melrose Harvey and Margaret Elizabeth Harvey.

He won a State Scholarship in 1899 and attended Maryborough Boys Grammar School and went on to study at Oxford University in London from 1906.

On May 8, 1918, Harvey left Sydney aboard the RMS Osterley and joined the 9th Battalion in France.

He returned to Australia on the HT Nestor in November 1919 and worked as a law clerk in Bundaberg.

On October 22, 1924, Harvey took his own life at the age of 38.

Eric Knipe: Born in Maryborough on July 13, 1890 to Reverend Dr Joseph Irvine Knipe and Mary Knipe (nee Meiklejohn).

He studied at Maryborough Boys Grammar School and was admitted as a solicitor of the Supreme Court of Queensland in 1913.

In 1916, 26-year-old Knipe enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) in Brisbane before being assigned to the 13th Reinforcements of the 31st Infantry Battalion.

He was sent to fight in France in October 1917 with the 31st Battalion.

In 1919, Knipe was promoted in the field to the rank of corporal with the AIF and was promoted to temporary sergeant later that year.

When returning home, he worked as a solicitor in Toowoomba before retiring to Hervey Bay after 1945.

He died on April 6, 1953, aged 62.

Harry William Lee: Born on May 14, 1892 to Harry

William Lee Sr and Susan Lee (nee Heilbron).

Lee Jr went to school at Maryborough Boys Grammar School and in 1910 began studying law with Charles Frederick Sheldon, of the Maryborough firm Corser, Sheldon and Harrington.

Lee was from a military family; his grandfather, Regimental Sergeant-Major Henry Robert Lee, had served in the British Army in the Crimean War and the Abyssinian campaign and his father had been the commanding officer of the Wide Bay Regiment and 4th Infantry Regiment.

After enlisting in 1914, he joined the 9th Battalion, which was one of the first to land at Gallipoli on April 25, 1915.

Lee was killed by shell fire on March 20, 1917 near Vaulx-Vraucourt in France.

The records show 'he received several nasty shell wounds about the body and died within half-an-hour'.

An obituary was published in The Maryborough Chronicle.

George Burnett Roberts: Born in Maryborough on August 8, 1895, he was the eldest of seven children of George Illidge Roberts and Ada Beatrice Bubb.

His father was editor of The Maryborough Chronicle for 33 years.

George finished his senior year at Maryborough Boys Grammar School in 1912 and enlisted in Maryborough in September 1916.

When he enlisted, Roberts was in the third year of law study with Thomas Morton, of Morton Gordon & Morton, Maryborough.

He left Australian in February 1917 with the 16th Reinforcements of the 13th Machine Gun Company, arriving in Plymouth in April 1917.

He served in France as a private, and returned to Australia aboard the City of Poona, arriving in Brisbane in May 1919.

Roberts was admitted as a solicitor on March 5, 1921 and entered a partnership with McSweeny & Barron of Wondai, Murgon and Goomeri.

He died in Murgon on September 30, 1976, aged 81.

Colin Pride Stumm: Born in Gympie on May 6, 1892 to Jacob and Margaret Stumm, the eighth of 10 children.

His father owned The Gympie Times newspaper.

After spending two-and-a- half years at Maryborough Boys Grammar School, Stumm went to work in the Union Bank at Pittsworth in 1908.

In 1915, a few months short of completing his five years of legal studies in Gympie, he enlisted and was called to duty as a 2nd lieutenant in the Central Queensland Light Horse.

On August 25, 1915, Stumm went to Gallipoli as a troop leader with the 2nd Light Horse Regiment.

Stumm was appointed captain in August 1917 and then took on the role of adjutant of the regiment.

Stumm left the regiment in 1919 to return to Australia and finish his legal studies.

From 1921 to 1951 he practised as a solicitor in Rockhampton. He died on October 4, 1962 at the age of 70.

William Albert Amiet: Known as Bill or AW to his friends, he was born in June 1890 near Geelong in Victoria and studied law as he taught at Maryborough Boys Grammar School.

Amiet was admitted as a barrister on May 2, 1916 and enlisted on the same day.

He joined the 26th Battalion, which was stationed at Enoggera, Brisbane and left Brisbane on the HMAT Boonah on October 21 1916.

Amiet spent five months in camp at Rollestone, where his duties included preparing offence reports, courts martial, courts of inquiry and absentee reports.

He saw action in late June 1917 in the Bapaume area of France, and was made 2nd lieutenant on August 1, 1918.

In early October 1918 Amiet was involved in heavy fighting at Bellicourt, sustaining shrapnel wounds to the thigh on October 3, 1918.

On returning from the war in 1919, Amiet went into partnership with solicitor Vincent Macrossan in Mackay; their firm, Macrossan & Amiet, survives today.

Amiet died in Mackay on April 13, 1959, aged 68. A library at the James Cook University campus in Mackay has been named after him, and so has a street in the Canberra suburb of Franklin.



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