Sara Ashdown stands with resident Avalon Cavendish, Fraser Coast Wildlife Preservation Society president Sara Gerdsen and environmentalist John Parsons to inspect the marked trees.
Sara Ashdown stands with resident Avalon Cavendish, Fraser Coast Wildlife Preservation Society president Sara Gerdsen and environmentalist John Parsons to inspect the marked trees. Alistair Brightman

More foreshore trees to face the axe

A DECISION made by the Fraser Coast Regional Council to remove five mature eucalypts along the Pt Vernon foreshore has residents and environmentalists outraged.

Pt Vernon resident Avalon Cavendish, who lives across the road from the trees, said home owners in the "Eagle's Nest" area had not been consulted by the council at any time about the imminent tree clearing.

"No one has received any letters and I found only on Tuesday as I saw the stakes driven into the ground near the selected trees," she said.

A council spokesperson confirmed yesterday "the council does not consult residents with these types of projects".

It is unclear exactly when the gums, which Ms Cavendish said housed a family of at least four sugar gliders, will be removed.

The tree clearing is part of the council's efforts to widen Charlton Esplanade in Pt Vernon.

About 1.2 kilometres of road between Corser and Flinders Sts will be widened.

But Ms Cavendish, who runs a bed and breakfast from her home across from the trees, said she did not feel the upgrade was needed.

"I just want them to protect the native animal habitat that is already there," she said.

The council's decision follows a spate of tree uprootings in Hervey Bay which have drawn the ire of residents, including the controversial decision to chop down several trees that were home to a colony of lorikeets at the Scarness Caravan Park.

Now Ms Cavendish is determined to make sure the sugar gliders' homes don't end up like the lorikeets'. Fraser Coast Wildlife Preservation Society president Sara Gerdsen said the council were destroying the habitat necessary for a healthy eco-system.

"It's not easy to relocate sugar gliders as you can't just take them to another tree," she said.

"I think sugar glider boxes should be installed as soon as possible in that area and there should be as many of them as there are hollows in the trees to be removed," she said.

Infrastructure and Planning Portfolio Councillor Trevor McDonald said those concerned about the environmental impact could join the council's Community Environment Program.

A wildlife spotter and catcher will be deployed by the council at the trees' removal.



‘Hi honey, I’ve got two nails in my head’

premium_icon ‘Hi honey, I’ve got two nails in my head’

Man lucky to be alive after surgeons had to drill into his skull.

Subbies target Turnbull over $15b payment ripoff

premium_icon Subbies target Turnbull over $15b payment ripoff

Why building subbies aim to target marginal seats

Students dress up their fundraiser for farmers

Students dress up their fundraiser for farmers

Fiver for a Farmer fundraiser

Local Partners