On five separate occasions Alan Lenthall has called for an ambulance to his Dundathu property and five times the emergancy service has past his home because of their iinaccurate rural addressing system. Alan holds his grand daughter Priya, who needed emergency help.
On five separate occasions Alan Lenthall has called for an ambulance to his Dundathu property and five times the emergancy service has past his home because of their iinaccurate rural addressing system. Alan holds his grand daughter Priya, who needed emergency help. Valerie Horton

Change sign before a life is lost

AS ALAN Lenthall’s tiny grand-daughter struggled to breathe he saw the ambulance fly past his front gate – again.

It was the fifth time the Lenthalls had called for an ambulance in the past few years and the fifth time they had been overlooked.

Mr Lenthall said a “bureaucratic stuff-up” several years ago led to a rural numbering sign on the Maryborough-Hervey Bay Road being placed in the wrong spot.

Emergency services guided by that sign are led up the right road – but to the wrong property numbers – time and time again, leaving lives at risk.

“Enough is enough,” Mr Lenthall said.

“I’ve spoken to the council about the sign and they agreed they would change it but nothing has been done yet.”

The ambulance was called to the Lenthalls’ Dundathu farm four times to attend to Mr Lenthall’s elderly father, who has since moved to a nursing home.

Each time the ambulance went whizzing past their gate before turning around and finding them.

The last straw came when Mr Lenthall’s three-month-old grand-daughter Priya, who was born prematurely, had trouble breathing a few weeks ago.

“We rang triple-0 and we told the operator we would be at our gate with our car’s hazard lights on, because we knew the ambulance would have trouble finding us,” Mr Lenthall said.

“But they went screaming past again, despite us having two of our cars at the end of the driveway with our lights flashing.

“We had to run out on to the road waving our arms about so they’d see us.

“Luckily my daughter, Priya’s mum, is an intensive care nurse and helped get her breathing properly.”

The ambulance arrived minutes later and the baby recovered but Mr Lenthall said something needed to be done before a life was lost.

The Fraser Coast council is providing a response, to be published on Monday.



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