Nathan Hauritz helps local club

NATHAN Hauritz has reached the top of the cricketing world, but he hasn’t forgotten his roots.

Now Australia’s number one spinner, someone who cut his teeth in the game in Hervey Bay is hoping he can help another local lad scale the same heights.

The 28-year-old is going into bat for the juniors of the city where it all began for him.

Hauritz has donated $5000 of his own money to help the game continue to flourish.

But that’s only the tip of the iceberg – so to speak.

There is the potential for a lot more money to end up in the bank account of the Hervey Bay Cricket Association, providing the former Torquay State School and Urangan High student and his Australian team-mates perform well.

Hauritz, who has played in 15 Tests and 55 one-day internationals to date, will donate 10 per cent of all the prize money he earns during Australia’s tour of India and the Ashes series against England to the association.

He said putting his hand in his pocket was the least he could do.

“Mate, I wanted to put something back into the game and I couldn’t think of a better way than giving the Hervey Bay Cricket Association a bit of a cash boost,” said Hauritz, who lived in the city until he was 15.

“Every little helps these days and I hope it can help make a difference.

“I just hope you lot (England – this writer is a proud Pom) don’t play well and win many,” he laughed.

“It would be fantastic to donate as much as I can.”

However, Hauritz, who now lives in Sydney and plays for NSW, said it was not only on the field of play that he would be hoping to help raise some funds for Hervey Bay.

“If anyone donates $500 to the cause I’ll get them a shirt signed by the team and for $1000 I’ll throw in a signed bat as well as a shirt,” said Hauritz, who played his club cricket for Cavaliers while he lived here.

Hervey Bay Cricket Association official Neville Bush said he had been blown away by the gesture.

“I was lost for words when Nathan told me he wanted to do this,” Bush said.

“It was all off his own back as well – we didn’t approach him.

“I think it’s an absolutely fantastic gesture to be honest.

“There is no doubt that it will really help our cause.”



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