Opinion

Nowhere to hide sins in online realm

EDITORIAL: You commit the crime, it goes online.

How I wish I'd thought of that, but I didn't.

It was reporter Carlie Walker's little gem when we were discussing the increasing number of people requesting reports of their previous misdemeanours be removed from our website.

The trouble is, they say, that when potential employers do an internet search on their names, a report on their court case appears.

This is the new dilemma for those who break the law and are found guilty of it.

It's also a problem for media groups around the world as they grapple with the importance of online articles as a record of history in the future.

While it is tempting to take away the pain these people are feeling, it is not our position to rewrite events.

Poor choices tend to have poor consequences and they can last a long time.

Those who contemplate drink-driving, petty theft, acts of violence or any other crime need to be aware that there will be no place to hide from their actions once they face a court and are found guilty.

We live in a digital age and, 50 or 100 years from now, the stories we write online will help paint a picture of life in the early 21st century.

It is important that it is not whitewashed, but represented fairly and accurately.

Topics:  court crime editorial fraser coast chronicle hervey bay john parker maryborough online



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