Domestic Violence awareness program - Maryborough Patrol Group police domestic violence liaison officer Sergeant Hayley Skyring talking to Year 10 students from St. Mary's College.
Domestic Violence awareness program - Maryborough Patrol Group police domestic violence liaison officer Sergeant Hayley Skyring talking to Year 10 students from St. Mary's College. Cody Fox

OPINION: Why Love Bites is a must-do program for Coast teens

EVERYONE else figured it out years ago.

School-based education programs are where positive behaviours have been drilled into children to help minimise the pain of negotiating life.

Things like Slip, Slop, Slap to avoid skin damage from the sun, the food pyramid for healthy eating, mandatory exercise to get the endorphins pumping. But what about healthy relationships?

Although I only graduated seven years ago, sentiments like those presented in the Love Bites program would have been beneficial to my friends and me.

As a teenager I had no information about what constituted toxic behaviour. Although it never felt right, I had no idea when my friends' partners asked for all their social media passwords that it was a form of control.

We knew it was wrong when we were harassed by others but we had no idea where to seek support. My knowledge of the law and domestic and family violence came from newspaper clippings.

The candid answers from students on page four of today's Chronicle point out why it is so important programs like Love Bites exist.

Education on not just the law but also sex, support networks and consent are tools that I believe many adults would benefit from also.

To create a society where the attitudes that perpetuate domestic and family violence are changed, we need to throw everything into eye-opening programs like this.



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