Opinion

Our brave Steph has earned win and maybe saved lives

Cancer survivor and Chronicle journalist Stephanie Kay, 22, thinks all cancers should be taken seriously.
Cancer survivor and Chronicle journalist Stephanie Kay, 22, thinks all cancers should be taken seriously. Robyne Cuerel

EDITORIAL: It is a great achievement for any journalist to win an award - but it is something else altogether for a journalist to win an award as early in their career as our very own Stephanie Kay.

Stephanie was a cadet and had been working at the Chronicle for less than two months when she wrote the article that earned her a Clarion award.

Stephanie has a natural flair for writing and a gift for telling a story well. Even more than that, she is a good listener, is blessed with loads of empathy and has a desire to help her community.

When she decided to share her own personal story about how she survived bowel cancer, it struck me how very brave she was.

Her article was especially important because bowel cancer is one of many diseases that does not get enough notice or publicity.

As Steph said in her feature article, "we're talking about bowels, bottoms and poo; there's no nice way to describe it".

That may be true, but talking about our bodies and their functions is something that has to become less taboo or we will continue to lose people to diseases that, if diagnosed early, can be effectively treated.

Well done Steph - while your article has deservingly won a top award, it has also potentially saved lives and that is something of which you should be incredibly proud.

Topics:  carlie walker clarion awards editorial stephanie kay



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