Personal breathalyser not accurate

ANDREW Scott Skerry was regretting the day he forked out $150 for a self-breathalyser when he fronted court last week to answer to a charge of drink-driving.

The Hervey Bay Magistrates Court heard the concreter had a reading of 0.146 when he was pulled over by police for an RBT on the morning of December 6.

Skerry, who got on the booze the night before, told the court he had relied on a reading of 0.03 per cent from his personal breathalyser before he left home.

“I tested myself and it came back as 0.03 per cent,” he said outside of the court.

“So I sat around for a while and then decided to go into town to check my lotto, pick up the paper and get some breakfast – the same thing I do every Sunday.

“I even went past the police on the way there and didn’t give it another thought.”

Magistrate Graeme Tatnell sympathised with Skerry’s predicament and commented on recent media reports about faulty personal breathalysers.

He handed down a 10-month disqualification and a $1250 fine.

Skerry, who had jeopardised his job by losing his licence, said he hoped no other Fraser Coast residents would be fooled by a faulty breath tester.

“Don’t use them and don’t trust them.

“I destroyed mine after I read the disclaimer.”



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