Julie Thomson, from Possum Paradise garden nursery, welcomes the start of spring.
Julie Thomson, from Possum Paradise garden nursery, welcomes the start of spring. Alistair Brightman

Pests hitch a ride with warm days

SPRING has arrived and so have pesky fruit flies – in the garden and in the kitchen.

As temperatures have warmed up over the past week more flying pests have made themselves at home in our homes.

Two types of fruit fly are common in the Fraser Coast.

The commonly known Queensland fruit fly attacks fruit and some vegetables that are growing in gardens and orchards. They are the most common agricultural pest in the area.

Senior research scientist Hainan Gu, from Agri-Science Queensland, said the Queensland fruit fly was a native insect that attacks a large range of fruit and vegetables.

“At this time of the year, as the temperature goes up, the activity of these flies can increase,” he said.

“Most of the flies that attack the fruit are female and they will lay their eggs in the fruit.

“They like the ripe fruit. The unripe fruit has peel too hard to penetrate.

“To prevent the attack of backyard fruit by these fruit flies, one may use paper bags to cover fruit, although protein bait can also be used as in some commercial orchards.”

For advice visit one of the Fraser Coast's plant nurseries.

The smaller fruit flies often seen in the kitchen hovering around over-ripe or rotten fruit are a different species and are commonly known as the vinegar fruit fly.

“It's hard to get rid of them,” Mr Gu said.

“They like rotten fruit and can often be seen in the bin.

“The best way to avoid these flies is to remove such fruit and vegetable materials and use insecticides suitable for house or garden use, but people need to refer to the application instruction of this kind of insecticide before use.”

Spring arrived yesterday with a mild day and more of those conditions are expected through the season.

The Bureau of Meteorology is expecting slightly above-average rainfall on the Fraser Coast this spring, with warmer night-time temperatures and slightly cooler daytime temperatures than the average.

Queensland Climate Services manager Jeff Sabburg said a La Nina pattern was developing and persisting in the tropical Pacific Ocean which would impact on Queensland's climate.

“That has an influence on Queensland's rainfall so expect above-average rainfall over the spring period.

“The average rainfall for spring is 200mm to 300mm.”



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