Mark Wraight with his children Chasegun and Rihanna in their Casino backyard.
Mark Wraight with his children Chasegun and Rihanna in their Casino backyard. Susanna Freymark

Why these kids are too scared to play in their own backyard

Warning: Some may find the content distressing

MARK Wraight's children were thrilled when he brought home a lamb. They called the lamb Billy and made a home for it out of a cardboard box.

Their yard is fenced and there is plenty of grass for a grazing lamb. For seven weeks, Billy romped in their West St backyard.

On Thursday, August 18, at 9.10pm, Mr Wraight looked out the kitchen window and saw two black kelpie dogs savaging Billy's throat. He ran out with a broom and chased the dogs away.

 

Billy the pet lamb was killed by two suburban dogs in Casino.
Billy the pet lamb was killed by two suburban dogs in Casino.

"Billy was tied up and had no way to get away," Mr Wraight said.

He phoned 000 for police at 9.22pm and they said someone would come out.

At 9.59pm he still hadn't heard from anyone so he phoned the police again and they said they were busy and someone would come.

No-one turned up.

Rihanna Sriwichai, 3, feeds Billy the lamb before he was mauled by dogs.
Rihanna Sriwichai, 3, feeds Billy the lamb before he was mauled by dogs.

His children, three-year-old Rihanna and two-year-old Chasegun, are now too scared to go outside and play in the backyard.

The photos of Billy's body are disturbing. The lamb's throat was gouged and bloodied and it would have died quickly.

When Mr Wraight called the council, a ranger came out to see him and asked him to fill in complaint forms.

Mr Wraight said he knew the owners of the dogs and had not been approached by them. He won't let the children play in the backyard in case the dogs return.

 

Billy the pet lamb was killed by two suburban dogs in Casino.
Billy the pet lamb was killed by two suburban dogs in Casino.

Andrew Hanna, the council's manager of environment and regulatory services, said through the Companion Animals Act the council had the authority to deal with dog owners if their dog was involved in an attack .

"The first thing we do is look at the premises where the dogs are kept and ensure the dog owner can keep the dog contained," Mr Hanna said.

"We have to get evidence and talk to all individuals involved. This could involve tethering the dog or improving fencing.

 

"Only in extreme circumstances do we seize dogs and it is a lengthy process."



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