Despite being the lead agency for domestic violence prevention in Queensland, there is no overall number for breaches involving the Queensland Police Service.
Despite being the lead agency for domestic violence prevention in Queensland, there is no overall number for breaches involving the Queensland Police Service.

‘Unless there’s blood, it’s not real DV’

THE Queensland Police Service can't say how many of its officers have domestic violence convictions or protection orders stopping them contacting their ex-partners.

Despite being the lead agency for domestic violence prevention in Queensland, there is no overall number for breaches involving the QPS.

News Queensland was told a Right To Information request was required to reveal the overall number.

A spokeswoman said the system used by police did not supply flags for the offences, and statisticians would have to manually go through each ­officer's individual record. It comes after another two officers were stood down this week for domestic violence ­allegations.

An officer told News Queensland the QPS was the lead agency for the detection and prevention of domestic violence which made any committed by its own staff "very serious".

"They end up with a DV order and can't work as a police officer because they can't have access to weapons," the officer said.

"So they are a dead weight that the community pays a significant amount to sit around doing filing or whatever.

"I'm embarrassed that the community looks to police to protect them from DV, yet the QPS tolerates its own staff committing DV.

"It's clearly the case that the QPS takes the view that unless there's blood, it's not real DV and because it's not real DV let's just hide these people away in the organisation until it blows over."

News Queensland had asked the QPS what position it took on domestic violence committed by its own staff; how many employees were currently working within the QPS with domestic violence convictions and orders; where the people were currently working; and what were the implications of such orders.

Bond University associate professor of criminology and former Queensland detective Terry Goldsworthy said the figures should be accessible through the QPS discipline database.

"Everyone knows about it because they are placed on restricted duties because they can't access a firearm and that is one of the big implications when an officer has a DV order taken out against them, it precludes them from doing their job to the full extent," he said.

"With the changing attitudes of DV, do we need to look at what happens to those police if they engage in it?

"(Former Commissioner) Bob Atkinson got very serious about drink driving, if you meet a certain level of criteria you are sacked."



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