The majority of Queenslanders think Australia is a great place to live, report shows.
The majority of Queenslanders think Australia is a great place to live, report shows.

QLD the place to live — for now

QUEENSLANDERS are more pessimistic about the future of housing affordability and living costs over the next decade than any other lifestyle factor, a new report shows.

A National Australia Bank survey of more than 2000 Australians reveals 92 per cent of respondents thought the state was a "great place to live" in 2018 - joining Tasmania as the most positive state in the country.

Queenslanders are pessimistic about the future of housing. Picture: Richard Walker.
Queenslanders are pessimistic about the future of housing. Picture: Richard Walker.

The report titled 'Life in the "Lucky Country" - What makes Australia great?' found the people and the lifestyle was what made the Sunshine State so appealing, but Queenslanders were the least positive of all the states when it came to public transport and travel time.

Looking ahead, just over 50 per cent of Queenslanders think Australia will be a great place to live in 10 years' time.

Queenslanders are pessimistic about public transport and travel time. Picture: Patria Jannides.
Queenslanders are pessimistic about public transport and travel time. Picture: Patria Jannides.

They were the most negative about the cost of living (41 per cent) and housing access and affordability (26 per cent), followed by safety (25 per cent) and jobs (21 per cent).

Entertainment and public transport were the only lifestyle areas Queenslanders expected to improve in the next decade.

NAB Group chief economist Alan Oster said it was concerning that those surveyed believed most lifestyle factors would deteriorate over the next 10 years, especially the cost of living, housing affordability and safety.

NAB Group chief economist Alan Oster.
NAB Group chief economist Alan Oster.

"There were also some interesting shifts in expectations for the future, with far fewer Australians positive about telecommunications and utilities, perhaps reflecting concerns in regards to the rollout of Australia next generation broadband and rising utility prices," Mr Oster said.



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