Qld’s most stolen cars: Commodores and Falcons

RACQ today released a list of the top ten most commonly stolen cars in Queensland with the Holden Commodore the first choice of thieves over the past 12 months.

Executive manager Insurance Communications Mike Sopinski said thieves generally targeted older less secure makes and models and those vehicles not properly secured.

"Our 2015 Car Security Index reveals many Queenslanders aren't utilising basic security measures with 28.5 percent of motorists admitting they don't always lock their cars," Mr Sopinski said.

"The research also reveals motorists are often letting their guard down at service stations with 58.1 percent saying they don't always lock their vehicle while fuelling."

"In a sign of the times the research also showed 28.1 percent admitted they wouldn't investigate or take notice of a car alarm sounding."

Top 10 Queensland Theft Targets: (Past 12 months)

1. Holden Commodore VT MY97_00 (145 stolen)

2. Holden Commodore VE MY06_13 (137 stolen)

3. Ford Falcon BA MY02_05 (123 stolen)

4. Toyota Hilux MY05_11 (120 stolen)

5. Nissan Patrol GU MY97_ 100 (116 stolen)

6. Holden Commodore VX MY00_02 (108 stolen)

7. Hyundai Excel X3 MY94_00 (98 stolen)

8. Holden Commodore VY MY02_04 (97 stolen)

9. Ford Falcon AU MY98_02 (93 stolen)

10. Toyota Hilux MY98_04 (89 stolen)

(Source: National Motor Vehicle Theft Reduction Council - Sept 2015)

"Many are taking car security seriously however, with close to half (43.7 percent) saying they considered the security features of the car they last purchased while 52 percent currently have an engine immobiliser and 46.2 a car alarm," he said.



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