Queensland Clinical Senate post gives area a voice on reform

WIDE Bay Medicare Local chair Paul Neeskens has been invited to bring his perspective to the Queensland Clinical Senate.

Dr Neeskens said he was one of 11 Medicare Local administrators who had been invited to give advice on various issues from the coalface.

The Hervey Bay doctor said he was looking forward to participating in the senate, which was aimed at delivering effective health care improvements.

The senate discusses and provides advice on statewide issues, most recently end-of-life planning, Dr Neeskens said.

"Our inclusion is the Queensland Clinical Senate means that primary health care professionals, service providers and patient groups from across the Wide Bay will have an even greater influence over health care reform," Dr Neeskens said.

Senate chair David Rosengren said inviting Medicare Local administrators to join the senate would help the health system become more integrated and allow patients to move more easily between services.

"Patients can often get lost in the maze when moving from preventative and primary healthcare through to specialised sub-acute and acute care in hospitals and non-hospital settings," Dr Rosengren said.



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