MIRACULOUS: Heart attack survivors Nicola Waerea and Brian Glanville reunited with the Toogoolawah paramedics that saved their lives to send an important message. Picture: Dominic Elsome
MIRACULOUS: Heart attack survivors Nicola Waerea and Brian Glanville reunited with the Toogoolawah paramedics that saved their lives to send an important message. Picture: Dominic Elsome

How a quick-thinking call to ambos saved two lives

WITHIN 10 minutes of calling paramedics, Brian Glanville was unconscious on the floor.

His night had began like any other Friday night - heading across to the pub for a pizza.

But when he got home, something didn't feel right.

"I came home and thought 'geez that pizza a bit rough, it's giving me a lot of indigestion'," Brian said.

As the pain intensified, Brian quickly realised it wasn't indigestion and called an ambulance.

It was a night back in March 2018, he is entirely grateful to Toogoolawah's first responders and paramedics that saved his life.

It was just minutes after advanced care paramedics Shane Sypher and Michael Bishop arrived on scene that his heart stopped.

The timely arrival meant the paramedics were able to use CPR and defibrillation to revive him, before transporting him via road to Brisbane.

"They guys were here in for 4-5 minutes. It was the fact that I did recognise it early and the guys were so quick in getting there - otherwise I might not be here," Brian said.

Brian also benefited from a new clot-busting treatment called Thrombolysis, which is being hailed as a game changer for rural paramedics, buying patients more time to get to hospital.

Nicola Waerea and Brian Glanville reunite with the Toogoolawah paramedics that saved their lives to send an important message. Picture: Dominic Elsome
Nicola Waerea and Brian Glanville reunite with the Toogoolawah paramedics that saved their lives to send an important message. Picture: Dominic Elsome

It was similar story for Nicole Waerea, who woke up in the early of October 15 this year, with a similar uneasy feeling.

"I got up about 1am one morning, and it was like a brick on my chest," Nicole said.

When Michael Bishop arrived, again responding to a heart attack call, Nicole within moments went into cardiac arrest.

But with paramedics already with her, she was able to be resuscitated and airlifted to Brisbane.

Nicole was full of praise for how the Toogoolawah paramedics handled the situation.

"These guys are really great - they're amazing," she said.

Paramedic Shane Sypher said in both cases, the early detection and quick call to 000 saved the pair's lives.

"You don't want to be in that situation on your own with no help because you've been waiting," Shane said.

"If we come round do the checks and there's nothing wrong - either way it settles the mind, even if it's only indigestion."

Nicole and Brian were reunited with the paramedic team at Toogoolawah for the first time since their attacks on Thursday.

Shane said it was wonderful to see both so healthy.

"It's something that we don't see very often, especially in the country setting because of that time factor," he said.

"It's great to see the end result, because it's one in very few that we are successful."

The key message the group wanted the public to take away was to make the call, even if you're not sure - with Nicole and Brian being the "walking examples" of why time matters.



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A 135-year-old heritage listed building post was also damaged